Speech-Language Pathology: The UDC Edge

Experience | Commitment | Students First

MS Speech-Language Pathology

Program Description

The Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology has been in existence for more than 30 years.  The program was first accredited in 1981 and has maintained continuous accreditation.

The SLP graduate education program is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), and has the distinction of being the first accredited training program at a Historically Black College or University. The program has also been designated a Center of Excellence by its University of the District of Columbia peers.  The master’s program has a long history of excellence in preparing clinicians to serve children and adults across the communication disorders spectrum, with particular emphasis on sociocultural and sociolinguistic impacts on service delivery.  The outcomes of program graduates, such as Praxis pass rates and employment rates, support the relevancy and value of the program’s mission, goals, and approaches in the lives of graduates and the clients they serve.

Program Mission

The Master of Science program in Speech-Language Pathology promotes innovation in scholarship and service. That innovation fosters excellence in evidence-based clinical knowledge and produces effective, engaged practitioners who are compassionate and culturally competent to serve the communication needs of a diverse and global community.

Outcomes for Student Learning

Our outcomes for student learning are fully aligned with the Standards for Speech-Language Pathology clinical certification and required knowledge and skill acquisition defined on the KASA.  Program graduates will:

  1. Practice in a manner that is consistent with the professional code of ethics and the scope of practice documents for the profession of speech-language pathology.
  2. Adhere to federal, state, and institutional regulations and policies that are related to services provided by speech-language pathologists.
  3. Use the highest level of clinical integrity with each individual served, family members, caregivers, other service providers, students, other consumers, and payers
  4. Understand and use best professional practices related to maintenance of confidentiality for all individuals in accordance with HIPAA and FERPA requirements
  5. Use all forms of expressive communication—including written, spoken, and nonverbal communication—with individuals served, family members, caregivers, and any others involved in the interaction to ensure the highest quality of care that is delivered in a culturally competent manner.
  6. Communicate with patients, families, communities, and interprofessional team colleagues and other professionals caring for individuals in a responsive and responsible manner that supports a team approach to maximize care outcomes
  7. Use valid scientific and clinical evidence in decision-making regarding assessment and intervention.
  8. Use clinical judgment and self-reflection to enhance clinical reasoning.
  9. Access sources of information to support clinical decisions regarding assessment and intervention/management.
  10. Critically evaluate information sources and applies that information to appropriate populations.
  11. Integrate evidence in provision of speech-language pathology services
  12. Show evidence of care, compassion, and appropriate empathy during interactions with each individual served, family members, caregivers, and any others involved in care.
  13. Understand the impact of his or her own set of cultural and linguistic variables on delivery of effective care; individuals served on delivery of care; and between the caregivers and the individuals served in order to maximize service delivery. These variables include, but are not limited to: age, ethnicity, linguistic background, national origin, race, religion, gender, and sexual orientation.

Student Outcomes Data

Student Outcomes for CAS - Speech and Language Pathology Program

Program Requirements

The Master of Science degree program in Speech-Language Pathology requires two years of full-time study (with summers) to complete for students entering with a background in the discipline.  Students entering without an undergraduate degree in a related field will require additional semesters of study. In such cases, program duration will be determined by prerequisite course requirements.

Requirements for admission into the program include:

  • An undergraduate degree from an accredited institution. An undergraduate degree in Speech-Language Pathology is preferred
  • A minimum grade point average of 3.0 on a 4-point scale
  • Three letters of recommendation from individuals familiar with the student’s academic performance
  • GRE General Test scores
  • An interview with Program faculty

Requirements for Program completion include:

  • 57 credit hours. This does not include hours for prerequisite coursework
  • A minimum of 400 clock hours, including 25 observation hours, 375 supervised practicum hours. At least 325 hours must be completed at the graduate level
  • A minimum of 15 credit hours of clinical practicum
  • A minimum of two external clinical practicum placements

Requirements for Clinical Certification:

A complete description of the requirements for clinical certification, including the above-outlined program requirements, can be found at http://www.asha.org/certification/recommended/

 Requirements for State Licensing:

A complete description of the requirements for speech-language pathology licensure in the District of Columbia is available at https://doh.dc.gov/node/145912. District of Columbia Public Schools Speech-Language Pathology credentialing information can be found at https://osse.dc.gov/page/educator-credential-requirements-overview#schoolserviceprovider

UDC-NSSLHA

The university’s National Student Speech-Language-Hearing Association Chapter (UDC — NSSHLA) is an award-winning affiliate. The organization has a robust membership and ambitious agenda for supporting the needs and interests of its membership and supporting educational, service, and resource needs across the Washington, DC metropolitan region.

Program Faculty

Angela Bradford Wainwright, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Dr. Bradford Wainwright holds a Ph.D. degree in Speech – Language Pathology from the University of Memphis, the M.S. degree in Speech – Language Pathology from the University of the District of Columbia and the B.A. degree in vocal performance from Maryland University-College Park.  She is a specialist in adult neurogenics with an emphasis in aphasia and provides instruction in anatomy and physiology of speech, aphasia, voice disorders, research methods, and medical speech pathology. Her research interests include language and cognitive aging, psychogenic voice and language disorders, and aphasia.

Myesha G. Carter, M.S. CCC-SLP, Clinical Instructor

Myesha Carter holds M.S. and B.A. degrees from the University of the District of Columbia in Speech – Language Pathology.  She is a specialist in childhood language and early intervention.  She supervises Pre-clinical and Level One clinical experiences and provides instruction in language acquisition.

Weynshet Demessie, B.S. (SLP), Clinic/Office Manager

Weynshet Demessie is the Clinic/Office Manager and holds the B.S. degree from the University of the District of Columbia.

Richard Kalunga, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Dr. Kalunga holds the Ph.D. in Communication Sciences and Disorders from Howard University, the M.S. degree in Speech – Language Pathology from the University of the District of Columbia, and the B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology, Manchester, UK.  He specializes in articulation, phonological and language development and disorders, with a research emphasis in literacy and developmental correlates.

Natalie A. Ottey, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Dr. Ottey holds the Ph.D. in Communication Sciences and Disorders from Howard University, the M.Sc. degree in Speech-Language Pathology from the University of the District of Columbia and the B.A.A. degree in Early Childhood Education from Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada.  Her research interests include neurogenic motor speech disorders and pediatric neurogenic language impairments, with an emphasis in the treatment of apraxia of speech disorders.  She provides instruction in neurophysiological disorders of speech and swallowing.

Kristin Spivey, Ed.S. CCC-SLP

Kristin Spivey holds the M.S. and B.S. degree in Communication Disorders from Marshall University. She also holds an Ed.S. Degree in Early Childhood Special Education and Educational Administration. She is a specialist in childhood language and school-based services. She supervises Level One and Level Two clinical experiences, with a focus on communication needs of children K-12.

Accreditation Status

The master’s (MS) education program in speech-language pathology at the University of the District of Columbia is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2200 Research Boulevard, #310, Rockville, MD 20850, 800.498.2071 or 301.296.5700.


Contact info:

Richard Kalunga, Ph.D., CCC-SLP (Program Director) | T: 202.274.6851 | E: rkalunga@udc.edu

Devon Dee, M.A., CCCC-SLP (Clinical Coordinator) T: 202.274.5633 | E: devon.dee@udc.edu

Weynshet Demessie, B.S. (SLP)  (Clinic/Office Manager) | T: 202.274.6161 | E: wdemessie@udc.edu