Courses within SEAS


Subject Codes:           APCT            BMEG            CCEN            CMOP            CSCI            CVEN            ELEC            MECH


APCT Applied Computing

APCT 110/111 Introduction to Programming (3)
Introduction to program development using a programming environment. Topics covers a basic understanding of programming concepts and constructing numbers, strings, assignments, sequential vs. selective execution, nesting, loops, functions, arrays, reference parameters, file streams, etc.

APCT 115 Foundations of Computing (3)
Survey of computer science topics. Features applied concepts of iteration, induction, and recursion; functions and relations; propositional logic and predicate logic; graph and tree data structures; Boolean and computer logic; finite state machines; and algorithmic problem solving.

APCT 231/233 Computer Science I Lec/Lab (3/1)
Covers algorithm and program development using a higher-level programming language (i.e., Java). Use of control structures, functions, and arrays. Objects are introduced.

APCT 232/234 Computer Science II Lec/Lab (3/1)
Continuation of APCT 231/233. Emphasis on the object oriented programming (i.e., Java) Topics include multi-dimensional arrays, searching and sorting algorithms, data abstraction, file operations including random access files, classes, and introduction to linked lists, stacks and queues. Prerequisite: APCT 231/233.

APCT 341 Advanced Web Development (3)
This course will focus on introducing advanced web programming language such as PHP, JavaScript, ASP .Net, or CodFusion. It mainly focuses on understanding advanced web-development techniques that use databases to create web contents. Prerequisite: CMOP 235/236.


Subject Codes:           APCT            BMEG            CCEN            CMOP            CSCI            CVEN            ELEC            MECH


BMEG Biomedical Engineering

BMEG 101 Survey of Biomedical Engineering (3)
The course covers basic concepts tied to biomedical engineering and their applications. Further, it serves as an introduction to the fundamental science and engineering on which biomedical engineering is based. Further, the course provides a survey of various areas tied to biomedical engineering (e.g., assistive technologies, biomechanics, additive manufacturing, and bioimaging). Hands-on projects and case studies are designed engage the students and to provide baseline knowledge. The course is designed for science and non-science majors, but is a mandatory requirement for students majoring in biomedical engineering.

BMEG 235 Engineering Software & Programming (3)
This course introduces students to an array of software packages and applications applicable to the biomedical engineering curriculum and discipline. Course content includes mathematical programming software and applications (e.g., MATLAB, Python, COMSOL, and ANSYS), data acquisition and analysis software (e.g., LabVIEW).

BMEG 301/300 Bioinstrumentation Lec/Lab (3/1)
The course will introduce biomedical devices, their components and background of their use, as well as cover basic concepts for analog signal amplification and filters, digital acquisition, digital filtering and processing.  Students may gain the opportunity to do the following: explore different types of (biomedical-related) sensors; explore hands-on implementation of instrumentation; record physiologic signals. Lec./Lab 3 hrs. Prereq: ELEC 225/226 or by permission of instructor.

BMEG 302 Professional Issues in Biomedical Engineering (3)
The purpose of the seminar course is to expose students to an array of current research topics related to BME (e.g., via guest speaker lectures, case studies, journal and technical paper-readings, and interactive small group discussions). Topics covered include medical ethics, research conduct, written and oral technical communication, and other BME-related topics and issues. Knowledgeable faculty and professionals in the field of BME may be invited to present interactive and informative sessions to expose and engage the students. Prereq.: Junior standing, or by permission of instructor.

BMEG 304 Biomechanics (3)
This course provides a foundation of mechanics formulated towards addressing biomedical engineering problems. Here, the basic concepts and methods of mechanics (statics, dynamics, and mechanics) are applied to study the forces on the human body & biological tissues. For example, biomechanics of movement, cardiovascular biomechanics, and soft tissue mechanics will be explored.

BMEG 371/373 Analysis of Physiological Systems Lec/Lab (3/1)
This course provides an overview of systems theory with applications and case studies from bioengineering and physiology (e.g., nerve function, muscle dynamics, cardiovascular regulation, physiologic feedback control systems, properties of muscle, cardiovascular function). Analyses within the course includes: differential equations, linear and nonlinear systems, stability, time and frequency domain methods, feedback control, and biological oscillations. Case studies readings and analysis of actual physiologic data will comprise a portion of this course. Prereq.: MATH 151/155, MATH 152/156, and MATH 254, or by permission of instructor

BMEG 402 Biomedical Imaging Systems and Signal Processing (3)
An overview of biomedical signals and images including imaging modalities such as Xray, computerized axial tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be covered. Fundamentals of signal and image processing including data acquisition, filtering, 2D signals and systems, noise reduction methods and homomorphic filtering for image enhancement will be discussed. An overview of random signals and linear systems and power spectra will also be discussed.  Prereq.: Junior standing, or by permission of instructor.

BMEG 405 Biomedical Research & Clinical Experience (3)
This develops students’ experiences in a primary care facility, in a research lab, and/or service-learning with a community agency or public health project. The purpose of the course is to expose students to settings wherein they may appreciate the human and social context of biomedical-related research, to merge concepts learned in other courses, and lastly to observe the impact medical research on patients.

BMEG 495 Special Topics in Biomed. Engineering (3)
This course covers various areas within Biomedical Engineering (e.g., Big Data, Machine learning, Data Analytics and others) that are not covered within the other BMEG course offerings.  This course may be used as a technical elective. Lec./Lab 3 hrs. Prereq: permission of instructor

BMEG 491 Senior Design Project I (3)
Covers creative design, design problem formulation, structure of open-ended solution processes in system design; familiarization with technological resources; group projects on design of complex mechanical systems, feasibility studies, group presentation of project feasibility, and developing impact and planning statement. Lab 6 hrs., Prereq.: Senior-level standing

BMEG 492 Senior Design Project II (3)
Continuation of group projects from Senior Design Project I, including consideration of economic, risk and reliability factors, and development of preliminary designs, prototypes, tests and optimization, and project report and presentation. Lab 6 hrs., Prereq.: BMEG 491.

BMEG 681 Machine Learning for Medical Detection and Diagnoses (3)
This course covers an overview of the fundamental Big Data challenges. Complex data structures, data cleaning, data preprocessing, and semantic integration of heterogeneous, distributed biomedical databases will be examined. Existing machine learning, data mining, neural and other novel computing tools for biomedical data analysis will be explored. Data visualization and imaging analysis will be discussed. In addition, the nature of clinical data will be introduced, and the architecture and design of healthcare information systems will be covered. Comparisons of the state-of-the-art clustering and feature selections methods for microarray data classification will be furnished. Lastly, privacy and security issues will be discussed. For the course topics described above, case studies will aid in describing contemporary systems and current research.

BMEG 682 Biomedical Imaging Systems and Signal Processing (3)
This graduate level course offers in depth study of biomedical signals and images including imaging modalities such as Xray, computerized axial tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be covered. Fundamentals of signal and image processing including data acquisition, filtering, 2D signals and systems, noise reduction methods and homomorphic filtering for image enhancement will be discussed. An overview of random signals and linear systems and power spectra will also be discussed.

BMEG 683 Biomedical Engineering Seminar (3)
The purpose of the seminar course is to expose students to an array of topics related to Biomedical Engineering (BME) via guest speaker lectures, case studies, journal paper-readings, and interactive small group discussions. Topics covered include medical ethics, research conduct, written and oral technical communication, and other BME-related topics and issues. Knowledgeable faculty and professionals in the field of BME may be invited to present interactive and informative sessions to expose and engage the students.

BMEG 684 Physiological Systems Analysis (3)
This graduate level course offers in depth study of systems theory with applications and case studies from bioengineering and physiology (e.g., nerve function, muscle dynamics, cardiovascular regulation, physiologic feedback control systems, properties of muscle, cardiovascular function). Analyses within the course includes differential equations, linear and nonlinear systems, stability, time and frequency domain methods, feedback control, and biological oscillations. Case studies readings and analysis of actual physiologic data will comprise a portion of this course.

BMEG 689 Special topics in computer enabled biomedical engineering topics in Eng (3)
Covers a specific area related to biomedical engineering that is not normally covered in regular Ph.D. classes.

 


Subject Codes: APCT            BMEG            CCEN            CMOP            CSCI            CVEN            ELEC            MECH


CCEN Interdisplinary Computer Science and Engineering

CCEN 101 Introduction to Engineering (2)
Introduces freshmen interested in engineering disciplines to basic scientific principles and engineering concepts through hands-on experiments. These experiments enable students to acquire the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to be successful in the pursuit of engineering disciplines. In addition, students in this course will learn how to analyze, interpret and present data. Emphasis on guided design and problem-solving methodologies. Students undertake practice-oriented group design projects. Formal written reports and oral presentations will be required. Required of all freshman engineering students. Lab 6 hrs.

CCEN 701 Research/Dissertation (1-8)
This course will be taken by the Ph.D. candidate after passing the qualifying examination. It is a research-based course and it is directed by the Ph.D. advisor.

CCEN 702 Colloquia (1)
This course will be taken by the PhD candidate after passing the qualifying exam. It is a colloquiums based course and it is directed by the PhD advisor.


Subject Codes:           APCT            BMEG            CCEN            CMOP            CSCI            CVEN            ELEC            MECH


CMOP Computer Operations

 

CMOP 131/132 Computer Networking Fundamentals Lec/Lab (3/1)
This course is a study of local area networking concepts through discussions on connectivity, communications and other networking fundamentals. The course is designed to prepare the student to be successful in completing industry network fundamental certification exams.

CMOP 231/232 Wireless Local Area Networks Lec/Lab (2/1)
Fundamental concepts of Local Area Network architecture and protocols. Topics include (1) basic concepts needed to design, configure, and implement Local Area Networks and (2) the evolution of Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, ATM and wireless LANs (WiFi). Prerequisite: CMOP 131/132.

CMOP 235/236 Introduction to WebPage Development and HTML Lec/Lab (2/1)
This course in computer science develops basic skills in webpage development using the HTML programming language.
It introduces the process of developing a webpage by explaining two broadly known programming languages such as HTML, XHTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Prerequisite: APCT 231/233.


Subject Codes:           APCT            BMEG            CCEN            CMOP            CSCI            CVEN            ELEC            MECH


CSCI Computer Science

CSCI 135 Scientific Programming (3)
Through this course, students will learn how to solve their computation problems in C/C++-language using numerical methods. Students in the BSIT or BSCS programs are not allowed to take this course.

CSCI 241 Data Structures (3)
This course covers the design and implementation of data structures including arrays, stacks, queues, linked lists, binary trees, heaps, balanced trees and graphs. Other topics include sorting, hashing, memory allocation, and garbage collection. Prerequisite: APCT 231/233.

 

CSCI 251/253 Assemblers & Systems Lec/Lab (3/1)
Introduces assembly and machine level software concepts and applications. It will include the understanding of instruction sets, addressing techniques, input/ output programs, data representations, and logic. Prerequisite: APCT 231/233.

CSCI 306 Computer Ethics and Law (3)
A survey course that reviews implications and impacts of computing technology throughout the world. The course examines the policies that relate to the use of computer technology, such as privacy and national security, shared data and information, copyright and intellectual property, legislative and constitutional issues, changing labor force composition, and professional ethics. Prerequisite: APCT 231/233.

CSCI 308 Adv. Object-Oriented Programming (3)
This is an advanced programming that focuses on introducing object-oriented programming language (i.e., C++). Specially, it covers object-oriented principles such as classes, interfaces, inheritance, and polymorphism. Also, various programming concepts such as program structure, block, storage types, console and file I/O, functions, arrays, strings, pointers, call-by-reference, call-by-value, and dynamic memory allocation will be discussed. Prerequisite: APCT 232/234.

CSCI 315 Unix and System Programming (3)
This course focuses on introducing tolls for program development and efficient use of a workstation environment. Topics include UNIX commands, emacs environment, X-windows, separate compilation of large projects, user defined libraries, make files, intelligent debugging, perl, HTML, rcs/sccs, tcl/tk and assorted additional topics. Prerequisite: APCT 232/234.

CSCI 317 Multimedia Programming & Design (3)
This course will address the topics of multimedia programming and design such as scripting language, image editing software, the development of games, and dynamic applications. Prerequisite: APCT 232/234.

CSCI 325 Organization of Programming Lang. (3)
The study of the organization of programming languages, especially the run-time behavior of programs; formal study of programming languages specification and analysis; continuation of the development of problem analysis and solution, and of programming skills. Prereq: CSCI 241.

CSCI 341 Software Engineering (3)
Explores issues in design, development, documentation, coding and implementation of large software projects. The tools and techniques required for all stages are addressed. The functional requirements and decomposition of model problems are discussed. Validation, test and maintenance of large software systems are also covered. Prerequisite: APCT 232/234.

CSCI 342 System & Network Administration (3)
This course covers system administration, network planning, routine system maintenance, firewalls and security, Internet connectivity, system optimization, troubleshooting and scripting languages. Prerequisite: CMOP 131/132.

CSCI 343 Database Administration (3)
This course introduces database management systems design philosophy and design considerations for satisfying both availability and integrity requirements. Prerequisite: APCT 232/234.

CSCI 345 Human Computer Interaction (3)
This course provides an introduction to the field of human-computer interaction (HCI) that concentrates on the study of interaction between human (users) and computers. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above.

CSCI 351 Computer Networks (3)
This course aims to provide data communication fundamentals and the principles governing computer communication networks. It provides an understanding of the components of networks, how they are connected and the basics in the design and implementation of network protocols. A number of techniques and protocols with respect to addressing, subnetting, routing, multicasting, and the interconnection of heterogeneous networks are discussed. Prereq: CMOP 131/132 or CSCI 241.

CSCI 352 Network Security (3)
This course provide a comprehensive overview of fundamental network security concepts, techniques, and issues such as types of attacks computers/networks are vulnerable to, attacker profiles, and hardware/software defense solutions available. Prerequisite: CMOP 131/132.

CSCI 353 Information Security (3)
This course provides an in-depth understanding of general information security fundamentals, organization and operation security procedures and policies, handling of security incidents, security audit principles and practices, security ethics, and computer forensics. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above.

CSCI 398 Advanced Applied Programming (3)
The course explores developing applied applications for various computing environments. This course will cover programming language(s) that is not covered in the CS I and CS II.

CSCI 410 Theory of Computing (3)
Introduction to the theory of computing including: Regular languages, finite automata, transition graphs, Kleene’s theorem. Finite automata with output. Context-free languages, derivation trees, normal form grammars, pumping lemma, Turing machines, and more. Prereq: CSCI 241, MATH 152/156, or equivalent, MATH 213.

CSCI 412 Operating Systems (3)
This course introduces concepts of operating systems (including process, storage, and processor management techniques) and performance and security topics. Specifically, it concentrates on the kernel aspects of multi-tasking operating systems with the emphasis being on practical implementations. Prerequisite: CSCI 311/313.

CSCI 414 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence(3)
This course will introduce the basic principles, techniques, and applications of Artificial Intelligence. The course also touches on more recent developments in natural language processing, visual processing, machine learning, robotics, and philosophical foundations. Prerequisite: CSCI 241.

CSCI 415 Computer Org. and Architecture (3)
This course provides a comprehensive coverage of the entire field of computer design updated with the most recent research and innovations in computer structure and function. Prerequisite: CSCI 241.

CSCI 417 Functional Programming (3)
Covers functional programming language. It approaches programming as the construction of definitions for pure functions that act upon immutable data structures. The course focuses on problem solving techniques, algorithms, data structures, and programming notations appropriate for the functional approach. Prerequisite: APCT 232/234.

CSCI 421 Machine Learning (3)
The veracity, velocity, volume and variety of data available since the early 90’s has posed a major challenge to the traditional data analytical methodologies. Machine learning has the capability of making a computer to ‘sniff’ through these large piles of data, learns its pattern and discovers hidden knowledge. Thus, ML enhances accurate prediction, pattern recognition and knowledge discovery. This class will a combination of the theoretical and empirical approach to machine learning paradigms. Prereq: APCT 232/234.

CSCI 422 Introduction to Deep Learning (3)
Deep Learning is an emerging field of computer science that is built on the success of machine learning. It uses a high-level abstraction to improve the predictive capability of machine learning. This class will a combination of the theoretical and empirical approach to deep learning paradigms. Prerequisite: APCT 232/234, MATH 225, and MATH 152/156

CSCI 424 Introduction to Compiler Design (3)
Studies programming language design, error detection, and recovery techniques. Examines lexical analysis, syntactical analysis, symbol table handling, semantic analysis, code generation, and code optimization, compiler-compilers Prereq: CSCI 325.

CSCI 434 Analysis of Algorithms (3)
Introduction to theoretical algorithm analysis, including study of growth rates of functions, worst-case and average behavior, and divide and conquer. Topics will include graphs, strings and dynamic programming. Prerequisite: CSCI 241 and MATH 152/156 or equivalent.

CSCI 435 Digital Image Processing (3)
This course will address a theoretical and practical introduction to the area of digital image processing including image representation, formats, segmentation, edge detection, convolution, compression, etc. Prereq: Junior standing or above.

CSCI 436 Parallel and Distributed Computing (3)
This course covers the fundamental concepts of multithreaded, parallel and distributed computing by emphasizing the practice and application of parallel systems, using real-world examples. Prerequisite: CSCI 308.

CSCI 441 Digital Forensics (3)
This course will teach the concepts in digital/computer forensic analysis and Internet Investigations. Specifically, this course focuses on understanding various mechanisms to detect cyber-crime, preservation of evidence, government regulations, etc. In addition, legal and technical aspects of study to achieve a balance similar to that encountered during common cases in which computer forensics are employed. Prerequisite: APCT 232/234.

CSCI 451 Advanced Network Management (3)
This course will address the principles of network architecture and layering, multiplexing, network addressing, routing and routing protocols. Prerequisite: CSCI 342.

CSCI 452 Database Systems Design (3)
This course covers database design, entity-relationship and relational model, relational algebra, query language SQL, storage and file structures, query processing, database system architectures. Prerequisite: CSCI 241 or CSCI 343.

CSCI 453 Secure Software Engineering (3)
This course provides a detailed explanation of common programming errors and describes how these errors can lead to software systems that are vulnerable to exploitation. The course concentrates on security issues intrinsic to software systems. Prerequisite: CSCI 341.

CSCI 454 Computer Graphics (3)
This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of computer graphics. Students are required to know programming in C or C++. Basic mathematics (geometry and transformation) and basic linear algebra (such as matrix multiplication) are also required skill sets. In this course, the standard OpenGL library is going to be used to illustrate graphics theories and to show practices of computer graphics applications. Prerequisite: CSCI 241 and MATH 225.

CSCI 455 Cryptography (3)
This class will provide the student a basic understanding of cryptography through algorithms. In addition, this class will cover the necessary materials including: data structures, basic algorithms, computational complexity, elementary number theory, and basic cryptography including private key cryptosystems and public key cryptosystems. Prerequisite: Senior standing or above.

CSCI 456 Visualization (3)
This course provides understanding of general visualization techniques, the differences between scientific visualization, information visualization, and visual analytics, visual perception and cognitive issues when creating visual elements, and evaluation methods. Prerequisite: CSCI 454.

CSCI 478 Big Data Analytics (3)
This course provides understanding of big data analytics approaches including hadoop, mapreduce and data mining on big data. Prerequisite: CSCI 308.

CSCI 495 Senior Seminar (1)
This course is designed as a capstone experience to identify the cutting edge technologies and a broader context for knowledge in the field of Computer Science & Information Technology. Students are required to do in-class presentations by reading current research or survey papers. Prerequisite: 90 credit hours or more.

CSCI 497 Independent Study (3)
This course provides an opportunity for students get research experience on the analysis of selected problems or topics in computer science and information technology. Topic must be arranged with instructor and approved by department chair before registering. Notes: Can be repeated if topics substantially different with a maximum 6 credits. Prerequisite:  CSCI 308 and 90 credit hours or more.

CSCI 498 Senior Project I (3)
Students learn emerging topics and vocabularies in the discipline and problem-solving skills through capstone projects. This course teaches students how to continuously explore new ideas through their post-graduation life. Prerequisite: 90 credit hours or more.

CSCI 499 Senior Project II (3)
Students learn project management skills and intensive writing skills, and use the skills to professionally present the project results of Senior Project 1. Prerequisite: 90 credit hours or more.

CSCI 504 Design and Analysis of Algorithms (3)
Focuses on the design and analysis of algorithms to solve various classes of computational problems. Algorithmic techniques to be studied include divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, greedy methods, amortized analysis, branch-and-bound, randomizing, and backtracking.

CSCI 505 Foundations of Computer Architecture (3)
The internal structure and operation of modern computer systems is examined in this course.  Topics to be discussed include the design and operation of the ALU, FPU, and CPU; micro programmed control vs. hardwired control, pipelining, RISC vs. CISC machines, and various memory systems including caches and virtual memory; An introduction to parallel and vector processing, multiprocessor systems and interconnection networks will also be presented.  System performance will also be addressed.

CSCI 506 Principles of Operating Systems (3)
In this course theoretical and implementation aspects of operating system design are presented from both developer and user perspectives. Parallelism or concurrency aspects are explained using the concepts of process management, synchronization, deadlocks, job and process scheduling. Techniques of real and virtual storage management are covered for a variety of processing environments. Students design simulated operating system components and implement using a high-level language.

CSCI 507 Principles of Database Systems (3)
Focuses on theoretical and design aspects of database management system software. Topics include the entity-relationship model, database system architectures, data models, and file organization and access methods. A variety of database models including the relational, object-oriented and network models will be discussed.  Other topics include normal forms, concurrency management, query languages and query optimization.

CSCI 508 Principles of Data Communications Networks (3)
Provides a unified treatment of data communications networks from the perspective of data communication principle, components and services, line control techniques and network requirements and design. Topics include transmission principles and media, data encoding and channel capacity, modems and modulation techniques, error and line control techniques, protocols, data compression techniques, switching technologies, common carriers’ services and facilities and regulatory requirements. Prerequisites: graduate student standing with no deficiencies.

CSCI 509 Foundations of Software Engineering (3)
Fundamental software engineering techniques and methodologies commonly used during software development are studied. Topics include various life cycle models, project planning and estimation, requirements analysis, program design, construction, testing, maintenance and implementation, software measurement, and software quality.

CSCI 510 Principles of Artificial Intelligence (3)
In this course, the highly diverse field of artificial intelligence is explored from a theoretical and practical perspective. A variety of schemes for representation and reasoning will be discussed. Topics focusing on representation include symbolic, rule-based, frame-based, object, and semantic net systems. Topics focusing on reasoning include inductive, abductive and deductive systems, non-monotonic reasoning, temporal reasoning, model-based reasoning, and planning. Common LISP and Prolog will also be briefly discussed.

CSCI 511 Automata Theory and Formal Langs. (3)
Covers finite state machines and their limitations, tape automata and their limitations, Turing machines and basics of recursive functions, Post and Thue systems word problems, phrase-structure grammars, and the different versions of the halting problem.

CSCI 512 Computational Complexity (3)
Computational complexity and its applications in computer science and cryptography are explored. Basic concepts of polynomial, NP, and NP-Complete problems are developed in both intuitive and rigorous forms. Methods for determining the tractability of problems, the polynomial hierarchy, techniques and complexity of approximation algorithms, and current topics in complexity are also covered. The course also covers complexity topics in cryptography.

CSCI 513 Parallel Algorithms (3)
Introduces students to parallel computation and algorithm design for parallel machines. Topics include adapting conventional algorithms to fit parallel execution models and stochastic methods suitable for massively parallel machines.  Selected readings from the literature will be required.

CSCI 518 Special Topics in Theoretical Computer Science (3)

CSCI 521 Advanced Computer Architectures (3)
In this course novel computer architectures are explored.  Topics include parallel machines, multiprocessor and multi computer machines, dataflow machines, biologically inspired architectures, quantum computers and various interconnection structures. Performance evaluation aspects will also be considered.  Selected readings from the literature will be required.

CSCI 522 Advanced Operating Systems (3)
Presents the design principles and applications of advanced operating systems.  Topics include communications in distributed systems based on layered protocols, asynchronous transfer mode networks, the client-server model, remote procedure call, synchronization and deadlock in distributed systems; Various concurrency algorithms will also be presented.

CSCI 523 Advanced Database Systems (3)
Investigates the principles of object-oriented and distributed database systems, with an emphasis on algorithms and protocols for handling the complexity of managing data in a distributed environment. Topics include object-oriented and extended relational data models, object identity and persistence, replication, distributed concurrency control, distributed query processing and optimization, data security, semantic integrity control, optimal resource allocation, reliability, and failure recovery.

CSCI 524 Human-Computer Interfaces (3)
Covers the principles, concepts, and objectives of human engineering for interactive systems. Topics include definition of human factors, syntactic and semantic models of user behavior, design principles for user interfaces, interface presentation techniques, and evaluation methods. Selected readings from current research literature will be assigned.

CSCI 525 Compiler Design (3)
Explores the principles, algorithms, and data structures involved in the design and construction of compilers. Topics include context-free grammars, lexical analysis, parsing techniques, symbol tables, error recovery, code generation, and code optimization. Each student will implement a compiler for a small programming language.

CSCI 531 Principles of Computer Graphics (3)
Techniques and algorithms for creating and displaying a variety of 2-d and 3-d objects on raster-scan devices are discussed.  The mathematics underlying 2-d and 3-d rotations, reflections, scaling and perspective transformations will be presented.  Algorithms for clipping lines and polygons, curve fitting, surface rendering, etc. will also be presented.

CSCI 532 Image Processing (3)
Fundamentals of image processing are covered, with an emphasis on digital techniques. Topics include digitization, enhancement, segmentation, the Fourier transform, filtering, restoration, reconstruction from projections, and image analysis including computer vision. Concepts are illustrated by laboratory sessions in which these techniques are applied to practical situations, including examples from biomedical image processing.

CSCI 533 Computational Geometry (3)
Computational Geometry is used to developing algorithms for solving geometric problems in continuous spaces.  It has deep connections to classical mathematics, theoretical computer science, and practical applications such as computer vision, graphics, and engineering such as CAD. The problems dealt with are typically posed as spatial decompositions such as polygon partitioning and triangulation, convex hulls, Voronoi diagrams and Delaunay triangulations, geometric search, and curves and surfaces.

CSCI 534 Bioinformatics (3)
A variety of algorithms for the representation and visualization of genetic data will be presented in this course.  Appropriate material drawn from the fields of biology, physics and chemistry will also be presented so that the nature of genetic data can be understood.  Extensive readings will be required.

CSCI 538 Special Topics in Applications (3)

CSCI 551 Computer Network Architectures & Protocols (3)
Covers the architecture and principles of operation of integrated broadband networks particularly those capable of supporting different types of traffic (voice, video, data, graphics) over local and wide area networks. The focus in this course is on high-speed networks (LANs, WANs), switching designs and architectures, router designs and routing protocols, MPLS, IPv6, optical networking, satellite communications, and network performance evaluation. Hands-on practical projects are an integral part of the course.

CSCI 552 Network Programming (3)
Provides programming skills useful for network designers and network application developers. It first covers a brief introduction to networking concepts and protocols.  The course then covers topics including:  the UNIX model, socket programming (TCP/UDP/raw sockets) for client-server systems, Internet addressing, application protocols (SMTP, DNS, Telnet, ftp), Remote Procedure Calls (RPCs), multicasting, secure protocols (e.g. IPSec). The course places emphasis on the completion of hands-on projects.

CSCI 553 Network Security (3)
Provides students with a comprehensive overview of fundamental network security concepts, techniques, and issues. The course covers topics including: security basics and fundamentals, attackers and their attacks, secure data transmission protocols, cryptography, key management, security management, intruders and intrusion detection, operational security policies and procedures. This course also covers security approaches deployed in local and wide area networks. Hands-on practical projects are an integral part of the course.

CSCI 554 Wireless and Mobile Computing (3)
Ubiquitous access of information anywhere, anytime, from any device is being made possible to a large extent by wireless and mobile computing technologies. This course discusses key concepts of wireless communications, wireless networks including WiFi, Bluetooth, WiMax, ad hoc networks, cellular technologies (CDMA, UMTS, etc), mobility protocols (including mobile IP, SIP, SCTP), internetworking design architectures for heterogeneous wireless networks, mobility management techniques (handoff and location management), wireless Web (WAP), energy management algorithms,  and sensor networks.  The course places a strong emphasis on the completion of hands-on projects.

CSCI 558 Special Topics in Network Security (3)

CSCI 571 Logic Programming (3)
Provides an introduction to Prolog, the theoretical foundations of logic programming, and current research on applications of logic within artificial intelligence. Topics include a review of first-order logic, the resolution principle, semantics of logic programs and alternative proof procedures. Alternatives to first-order logic such as modal logics for representing and reasoning about knowledge and belief, and non monotonic and default logics will also be discussed. Assignments include problem sets and a number of Prolog programs

CSCI 572 Evolutionary Computing (3)
Focuses on concepts and techniques from genetic algorithms, genetic programming, and artificial life for modeling and developing software agents capable of solving problems as individuals and as members of a larger “community” of agents. Algorithms for solving optimization and learning problems will be stressed.

CSCI 573 Neural Networks (3)
Provides an introduction to concepts in neural networks and connectionist models. Topics include parallel distributed processing, learning algorithms and applications. Specific networks discussed include Hopfield networks, bidirectional associative memories, perceptrons, feed forward networks with back propagation, and competitive learning networks, including Kohonen and Grossberg networks.

CSCI 574 Natural Language Processing (3)
Covers the concepts and methods for the automated processing of natural language. Topics include pattern matching, parsing, dictionary and lexical acquisition, semantic interpretation, anaphoric reference, discourse analysis, and text generation and understanding.

CSCI 575 Speech-based Computing (3)
Topics addressed in detail in this course include the anatomy, physiology and physics of speech generation and reception, speech signal analysis/synthesis and computer representations of spoken data.  Systems to be discussed include text-to-speech, speech to text, multilingual speech software and speaker identification/verification.

CSCI 578 Special Topics in Intelligent Systems (3)

CSCI 598 Master’s Project (3)

CSCI 600 Master’s Thesis [3/term; 6 credits maximum]

CSCI 601 Advanced Algorithm Analysis (3)
This course is an advanced course in algorithms design and analysis. This is the advanced version of the 500-level counterpart. It covers many new topics and also revisit some the topics covered in 500-level counterpart in more detail. It will begin by reviewing sorting and graph algorithms as well as studying approximation algorithms, NP-completeness, heuristic algorithms, randomized algorithms, linear programming, pseudorandom generators, cryptography, etc.

CSCI 602 Theory of Computational Complexity (3)
This is a theoretical computer science course to identify the limitations of the computers through formalizing computation (by introducing several models including Turing Machines) and applying mathematical techniques to the formal models obtained.

CSCI 603 Pattern Recognition (3)
Pattern recognition systems, statistical methods, clustering analysis, unsupervised learning, feature extraction and feature processing.

CSCI 671 Autonomous Mobile Robots (3)
Fundamental constraints, technologies, and algorithms related to autonomous mobile robots. Topics include motion, kinematics, simulation testing, sensor incorporation and unmodeled factors. Develop an autonomous robot in simulation or on a physical robot.

CSCI 672 Visual Analytics (3)
Science of analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visual interfaces. Topics include visual analytics tools and techniques to synthesize information and derive insight from massive, dynamic, ambiguous, and often conflicting data, provide timely, defensible, and understandable assessments.

CSCI 673 Virtual Reality (3)
Concepts and techniques including a systematic introduction to the underpinnings of Virtual Environments (VE), Virtual Worlds, advanced displays, and immersive technologies.

CSCI 674 Advanced Topics in Networking (3)
Cloud computing, Mobile Ad Hoc networks, Future Internet, Internet of Things (IoT), Energy- Efficient Networks and Protocols, Mobile Multimedia, Broadband Wireless Networks (WiMAX, LTE, LTE-Advanced), Cognitive radio, Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks (VANETs) and Sensor Networking.

CSCI 675 Spatio-Temporal Databases (3)
Spatial and Temporal Databases: history, applications, practices, theory, design, implementation, indexing, and querying.

CSCI 676 Big Data Science (3)
Definition and applications of Big Data, Big Data in Cloud Computing, data- intensive parallel processing and column-oriented distributed data management.

CSCI 689 Special Topics in Computer Science (3)
Special Topics in Computer Science.


Subject Codes:           APCT            BMEG            CCEN            CMOP            CSCI            CVEN            ELEC            MECH


CVEN Civil Engineering

CVEN 105 Computer Aided Graphics (3)
This course provides students with hands-on, practical application of graphical modeling to create 3D parts for product design and manufacturing.  The main objective is to familiarize students with the CREO software so that they may demonstrate competency in generating 3D models of both existing and new components.  Finally they will produce a physical rendering of their model using 3D printing.  This course will lay the foundation for the Advanced Manufacturing course. Lec. 3 hrs.

CVEN 112 Engineering Experimentation (3)
Introduces the fundamentals of engineering experimentation. Modern equipment and instrumentation used in engineering laboratories are presented with emphasis on measurements. State-of-the-art instruments for measurement of angle, distance, pressure and temperature are used to illustrate the importance of understanding errors and their influence on measurements. The use of electronics in measuring instruments (both analog and digital) is demonstrated through the use of civil and mechanical engineering applications. Lec. 3 hrs.

CVEN 201 Engineering Mechanics I (3)
Covers statics of particles and rigid bodies; equilibrium, distributed forces; centroids; center of gravity; structure-trusses, frames, machines; forces in beams and cable; friction; moments of inertia. Lec. 3 hrs.: PHYS 201.

CVEN 202 Engineering Mechanics II (3)
Covers kinematics and kinetics of a particle. Planar kinematics of a rigid body; planar kinetics of a rigid body including force and acceleration; work and acceleration; work and energy; impulse and momentum, and vibrations. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: CVEN 201.

CVEN 206 Mechanics of Solids (3)
Covers axial forces, shear and moment, stress and axial loads, strain and axial deformation, torsion of shaft, stress in beams, columns, deflection of beams, energy methods, and elemental indeterminate problems. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: CVEN 201, MECH 205 (for ME Students) Co-req: CVEN 207.

CVEN 207 Mechanics of Solids and Materials Laboratory (1)
Covers introduction-purpose, scope, equipment/ apparatus, interpreting the text results, errors, writing reports. Experiments include Hooke’s Law, tensile testing of engineering materials, thermal expansion, torsion, bending moment and deflection of beams. Lab 2 hrs., Co-req: CVEN 206.

CVEN 241 GIS Fundamentals and Engineering Applications (3)
This course introduces the concepts and components of a geographic information system (GIS) including operational processes of spatial data acquisition, editing and QA/QC, metadata development, geodatabase design, spatial query and display, spatial analysis and modeling, preliminary GIS application development in the context of civil and environmental engineering applications.

CVEN 244 CE Materials Lec and Lab (3)
This course covers properties and uses of common civil engineering materials, such as cement, aggregates, concrete, asphalts, asphalt mixes, steel and wood. Design techniques of Portland cement concrete mix and hot mix asphalts. Laboratory tests to determine properties of materials used in construction such as cement, aggregates, concrete, asphalts, asphalt mixes, steel and wood.

CVEN 251 Urban Water Quality Management (4)
This course is designed to enhance student’s competence in theoretical and practical application of urban water quality sciences and related technologies to address the urban water quality problems and management. The course content includes environmental regulation, water quality, urban runoff, data mining, information technology, dynamic interactive online course delivery, and sustainable development. Lec and Lab 4hrs, Pre-req.: CHEM 111.

CVEN 301 Essentials of Surveying (2)
Introduces the student to the basic principles of measurement at or near the surface of the earth. The fundamental concepts of observing and establishing the linear and angular measurements necessary to determine the horizontal and vertical position of points required for engineering works are presented. The theory of errors associated with large scale measurements and the “management” of them through survey procedures and analysis are presented. The student will develop an understanding of the “tools” (procedures and software) necessary to process field data and produce horizontal and vertical control information (e.g. adjusted traverses, bench mark elevations, contour maps, etc.). Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: CVEN 202.

CVEN 302 Surveying Laboratory(1)
Introduces and practices the use and care of the instruments necessary to determine horizontal and vertical positions on or near the surface of the earth are presented. The student will develop an understanding of the application of the surveying procedures required to establish horizontal and vertical control points. The student will perform field exercises for the control of horizontal and vertical positions associated with engineered construction. Instruments used include levels (manual & automatic), theodolites (direction & repeating), distance measuring devices (tapes & electronic). Direct and indirect methods for observing and establishing measurements are covered. Prac. 42 hrs., per semester, Co-req.: CVEN 301.

CVEN 308 Applied Numerical Analysis for Engineers (3)
Covers modeling and error analysis, roots of equations; systems of linear algebraic equations, curve fitting; numerical differentiation and integration; ordinary differential equations; partial differential equations. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: MATH 254 or MATH 260.

CVEN 311 Theory of Structures (3)
Analyzes statically determinate beams and trusses, methods of determining deflection of structures, influence lines and application for moving loads and indeterminate structures including continuous beams and frames. Covers approximate analysis of indeterminate structures computer analysis of structures and performance characteristics. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: CVEN 206, MATH 254.

CVEN 312 Design of Steel Structures (3)
Covers the analysis and design of individual steel members such as tension members, compression members, beams, beam-columns, plate girders, and simple connections. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq: CVEN 311

CVEN 313 Theory of Structures Laboratory (1)
Equipment/apparatus, writing reports; experiments determining internal forces, reactions and deflections of both determinate and indeterminate structures are studied. Computer-aided analysis of structures of both determinate and intermediate structures are examined. Prac. 2 hrs., Co-req: CVEN 311.

CVEN 325 Hydrology and Hydraulics (3)
Hydrologic Processes, Precipitation and precipitation analysis, Hydrologic losses and infiltration, Runoff processes and estimation, Fundamentals and fluid properties, flow in closed conduits, flow in open channels, and fluid measurement. Prereq.: MATH 254, CVEN 206/207

CVEN 327 Hydraulics and Hydrology Lab (1)
Topics covered in lecture are demonstrated through hands-on practical exercises, lab experimentation, and use of computer modeling software. Co-req: CVEN 325.

CVEN 331 Principles of Geotechnical Engineering (3)
Studies soil classifications, stress, and compressibility of soils, immediate and consolidation settlement, time rate of settlement, earth pressure on structures, permeability and seepage, slope stability analysis for application in engineering design. Prereq.: CVEN 206, CVEN 325.

CVEN 332 Principles of Geotechnical Engineering (1)
Provides laboratory tests to determine the physical properties of soils for application in engineering design. Co-req: CVEN 331.

CVEN 335 Design of Structures (3)
Covers design of tension members, compression members, beams and columns, and simple connections. Analysis and design of reinforced concrete beams, slabs, columns, footings, and retaining walls using the ultimate strength method.

CVEN 336 Design of Structures Lab (1)
Topics covered in lecture are demonstrated through hands-on practical exercises, analysis and design. Commercially available structural software will be used. Prac. 3 hrs, Co-req. CVEN 335.

CVEN 351 Transportation Engineering (3)
Involves planning, analysis, and design of highways systems. Students work in teams during the preparation of the required design plans (using AutoCAD or MicroStation), cost estimates and project reports. Lec. 3hrs, Prereq.: CVEN 105 and CVEN 202.

CVEN 352 Civil Engineering Materials (3)
Studies properties and uses of common civil engineering materials, such as, cement, aggregates, concrete, asphalts, asphalt mixes, steel, and wood. Design techniques of Portland cement concrete mix and hot mix asphalts. Lec. 3 hrs., Co-req: CVEN 354. Prereq.: CVEN 206

CVEN 354 Civil Engineering Materials Lab (1)
Laboratory tests to determine properties of materials used in construction, such as cements aggregates, concrete, asphalts, asphalt mixes, wood, and steel. Lab. 3 hrs., Co-req: CVEN 352

CVEN 416 Advanced Structural Design (3)
Covers forced-deformation responses of structures under complex loading, interaction of the structural components and their behavior for both the elastic and inelastic ranges, analysis of frames with nonprismatic members by moment distribution, slope deflection, and column analogy. Lec 3 hrs., Prereq.: CVEN 325.

CVEN 417 Matrix Method of Structural Analysis (3)
Covers analysis of highly indeterminate structures by the transfer matrix method, displacement matrix method, and the matrix forced method. Lec 3 hrs., Prereq.: CVEN 311, MATH 260.

CVEN 418 Dynamics of Structure (3)
Studies responses of free-vibration, harmonic, periodic, and dynamic loading; analysis of nonlinear structural responses for single and multi-degree systems, and effect of damping and inelastic action. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: CVEN 202, CVEN 313

CVEN 419 Design of Concrete Structures (3)
Covers analysis and design of reinforced concrete slabs, beams, columns, footings, and frames using the ultimate strength method. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: CVEN 312.

CVEN 435 Foundation Design (3)
Studies shallow foundation analysis and factors to consider for design, bearing capacity and settlement, mat foundations, piles, caissons, lateral earth pressures and retaining walls, site improvement techniques, design of support systems, sheet piles, and special foundation system. Prereq.: CVEN 331.

CVEN 441 Wastewater Engineering (3)
Covers analysis and design of wastewater systems; unit operations and treatment kinetics; physical, chemical, and biological unit processes; principles of design of facilities for physical, chemical and biological treatment of wastewater; disposal of waste solids. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: CVEN 325 and CVEN 327.

CVEN 442 Water Resources Engineering (3)
This course covers water resources engineering, a particular emphasis on urban water resources systems. The topics include introduction to urban water systems, Drinking water systems and their design and analysis, urban waste water systems and design of sanitary sewer systems, Urban storm water management, Urban storm sewer systems and their design and analysis, Erosion and sediment control. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: CVEN 325 and CVEN 327.

CVEN 446 Env. Engineering and Science (3)
This course covers sources, characteristics, transport, and effects of air and water contaminants; biological, chemical, and physical processes in water; atmospheric structure and composition; unit operations for air and water quality control; solid waste management; and environmental quality standards. Discusses risk assessment, toxicology, and regulations governing environmental contaminants as well as environmental restoration.

CVEN 447 The Theory of Shells (3)
Studies theory and design of shell place by membrane and bending stress theories, application to the analysis and design of cylindrical shell, domes, paraboloids. Lec. 3hrs., Prereq.: CVEN 419.

CVEN 448 Construction Techniques (3)
Covers fundamental operations in construction, construction methods, selection of equipment, cost estimates, planning and scheduling construction projects. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: Senior standing.

CVEN 449 Environmental Engineering (3)
Covers hydrology; ground water; physical, chemical, and biological properties of water; introduction to water and wastewater treatment processes; physical and chemical fundamentals of air pollution; solid waste management. Introductory course for environmental engineering. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: CVEN 325.

CVEN 452 Urban Transportation Systems Design (3)
Continues Urban Transportation Planning. The focus is on the geometric and physical design of urban transportation systems. The fundamentals of traffic engineering are presented and applied to the solution of urban road congestion. Team design projects address local contemporary transportation issues. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: CVEN 351

CVEN 453 Traffic Engineering (3)
Involves the collection, analysis and use of traffic engineering data and introduces students to traffic operations and safety. Students use software for level of service analysis of un-signalized and simple signalized intersections. Students are required to prepare reports. Prereq.: CVEN 351

CVEN 454 Adv Traffic Engineering (3)
Involves advance traffic engineering, traffic operational and studies, and introduction to applications software for signal network optimization. Students are involved in several real-world projects and the preparation of technical reports. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: CVEN 351.

CVEN 462 Reliability and Optimization Methods in Engineering (3)
This course will provide a general survey of the complete field of Reliability and Optimization in various engineering applications. The course is designed to give a thorough philosophical base for Reliability and Optimization in engineering and mathematical techniques used along with common examples of application for engineering structures, components and systems. Senior standing.

CVEN 463 Sensing and Data Analytics for Infrastructure Systems (3)
This course will introduce the sensing and data analytics techniques across a broad range of engineering disciplines with a focus on infrastructure systems. This course will empower students with a basic skill set on sensing and data analytics and an ability to directly apply these tools for practical engineering problems. Senior standing.

CVEN 464 Engineering Ethics & Prof. Practice (1)
Provides an introduction to the engineering profession, professional practice, engineering law and ethics. The course also offers opportunities to explore the social implications and environmental impacts of technologies and to consider engineers’ responsibility to society.

CVEN 465 Introduction to Risk and Resiliency in Engineering (3)
This course will introduce natural and man-made hazards faced by engineering infrastructure and provide a comprehensive overview about the basic definition and engineering principles for risk and resilience assessment of various engineering systems.

CVEN 475 Project Planning and Scheduling (3)
Covers principles of planning, scheduling, and allocation of resources for construction projects. Study and application of critical path method (CPM) of network diagramming and calculation. Studies Program Evaluation and Review Techniques (PERT) and allocation of constrained resources and variation of schedules to optimize costs. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: Senior Standing

CVEN 476 Construction Project Management (3)
Covers elements of management as related to construction project; responsibilities of construction managers, on-site representatives, engineers, and inspectors; concept of developing the project team approach. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: Senior Standing.

CVEN 480 CE Technical Elect. Research-Professional Practice (3)
This course provides opportunity students to pursue research innovation in any sub-disciplines of civil engineering, or advanced topics in professional practice in any sub-disciplines of civil engineering.

CVEN 481 Fundamental of Eng. Preparation (1)
This course discusses examination preparation materials for the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exams—commonly called the EIT exams. Provides a brief overview of common engineering courses.

CVEN 486 Construction Estimating (3)
Interprets specifications as they affect project costs, quantity take-offs, including items necessary for construction but not called out on drawing and specifications; estimate of labor and costs. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: Senior Standing.

CVEN 487 Contracts and Specifications (3)
Examines elements of contract as related to engineered construction project. Provides an introduction to the technical concepts of preparing and reviewing specifications necessary for bidding and contracting engineering projects. Lec. 3 hrs., Senior Standing

CVEN 490 Special Topics in Civil Engineering (1-12)
Deals with a specific area related to civil engineering that is not normally covered in regular courses and for which there is sufficient student interest; may be used as a technical elective. Prereq.: Senior standing in Civil Engineering.

CVEN 491 CE Senior Project I (3)
The objective of this course is to develop ability to formulate, analyze and solve civil engineering problems through creative thinking, engineering education and using the principles of technical and professional practices. The students will apply the foundational knowledge and skills from the science and mathematics courses, engineering principles from the technical and professional courses to solve the civil engineering planning, analysis and design problems.  This course provides group projects for senior students to design civil engineering systems. Oral presentations and written report are required. Prereq.: Senior standing in Civil Engineering.

CVEN 492 CE Senior Project II (3)
Continues of Senior Project I in Civil Engineering. Final project report and presentation are required., Prac. 20 hrs. effort. Prereq.: CVEN 491.

CVEN 501 Advanced Mathematics (3)
Advanced mathematical concepts needed in the study of graduate engineering. Topics include linear Algebra, partial differential equations, complex analysis, transform calculus and numerical analysis.

CVEN 502 Risk and Reliability Methods in Engineering (3)
The focus of this course is on practical applications of risk and reliability methods for civil engineering design and analysis. This course covers concepts of uncertainty, random variables, probability and risk, fundamentals of sampling, Bayesian methods, Maximum likelihood principle, and uncertainty propagation and their applications in civil and geotechnical engineering. Techniques covered will include various reliability-based design and probabilistic methods such as first-order second-moment method, first-order reliability method, point estimate method, Monte Carlo simulation and moments methods. Term project is required on reliability based design in a relevant field of engineering.

CVEN 503 Optimization Methods and Advanced Statistics (3)
This course introduce concepts, modeling and solution methods for optimization problems. Topics include: convex analysis and polyhedral sets, unconstrained optimization methods (line search, trust region), the simplex method, duality theory, decomposition principles, linear and integer programming. The advanced statistical concepts will be covered.

CVEN 505 GIS Applications in Civil and Environmental Engineering (3)
This course covers examination of data structures used in geographic information systems. Map projections and coordinate systems used in mapping. Database creation, maintenance, and integrity. Applications of GIS methods for solving civil engineering problems in land management and related areas.

CVEN 521 Modeling Methods in Water Resources Engineering (3)
This course covers a comprehensive view of stormwater modeling and management with an emphasis on current modeling techniques and design practices. Provides an in-depth review of fundamentals of hydraulics and hydrology along with spatial analysis tools required for effective stormwater modeling and management.

CVEN 522 Advanced Engineering Hydrology (3)
This course covers dynamics and statistics of principal hydrometeorological processes; Hydrologic cycle; Precipitation, Infiltration; Evapotranspiration; Surface runoff; Percolation; Groundwater motion; Storm water management; Hydrologic modeling; Water budget; Hydrologic time series, Stochastic analysis.

CVEN 523 Adv. Urban Stormwater Management (3)
The course presents a comprehensive view of urban stormwater modeling and management with an emphasis on current modeling techniques and design practices. The course provides an in-depth review of fundamentals of hydrology along with analytical tools required for effective stormwater modeling and management.

CVEN 524 Open Channel Hydraulics (3)
The course covers review of basic hydraulics: Continuity, momentum and energy balance; Uniform and steady flow; Non-uniform flow; Critical flow; Gradually-varied flow; Surface profiles; Chezy’s and Manning’s formulas; Laminar and turbulent flow; Velocity distribution; Unsteady flow; Rapidly varying flow; Flood routing; Design of open-channels.

CVEN 525 Water and Wastewater Engineering (3)
This course covers design of water treatment facilities for the production of potable waters from surface and groundwater systems. Design of wastewater treatment facilities for the reduction and elimination of organic and inorganic pollutants.

CVEN 526 Water and Environmental Policy Development (3)

CVEN 527 Environmental Engineering (3)
This course covers physical, chemical, and microbiological components of environmental systems in science and engineering. Introduction to water quality management, air pollution control, solid waste management, pollution prevention techniques, and risk analysis.

CVEN 528 Water and Wastewater Treatment Processes (3)
This course introduces students to the principles and design of physical, chemical and biological treatment systems for potable and wastewater applications.

CVEN 529 Advanced Topics in Water and Env. Engineering (3)
This course covers study relating to specialized topics associated with water and environmental engineering.

CVEN 531 Advanced Geotechnical Engineering (3)
This course is designed to integrate all aspects of geotechnical engineering principles at an advanced level. It covers the advanced soil mechanics principles such as stress-strain characteristics of coarse- and fine- grained soils, shear strength properties of soils under drained and undrained conditions, plastic equilibrium of soil masses, failure conditions, Rankine and Coulomb lateral earth pressure, slope stability, geotechnical numerical modeling, advanced methods for geotechnical subsurface investigation, groundwater and seepage.

CVEN 532 Soil Dynamics and Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering (3)
The  purpose  of  this  course  is  to  familiarize  students  with  the  field  of  geotechnical  earthquake engineering and the methods used for seismic analysis and design in geotechnical engineering.  This course covers fundamentals of soil dynamics, plate tectonics and earthquakes, seismic ground responses, design ground motions during earthquake, determination of soil properties for ground response analysis, dynamic properties of soils, dynamic lateral earth pressure, seismic performance of slopes and earth structures, soil liquefaction, field test procedures for evaluating liquefaction potential , liquefaction remediation techniques.

CVEN 534 Advanced Material and Pavement Engineering (3)
This course covers advanced civil engineering materials related to transportation and coastal infrastructures. The topics include fundamental principles underlying the design, construction, maintenance and repair, and management of highway and airfield pavement systems. Pavement performance (functional/structural; evaluation); pavement mechanics (multi-layered elastic theory; slab theory); pavement materials (properties and characterization); environmental effects; current rigid and flexible design methods (new/rehabilitation); construction (new construction; maintenance/repair; rehabilitation); economic evaluation; pavement management.

CVEN 535 Advanced Foundation Engineering (3)
This course covers studies shallow foundation analysis and factors to consider for design, bearing capacity and settlement, mat foundations, piles, caissons, lateral earth pressures and retaining walls, site improvement techniques, design of support systems, sheet piles, and special foundation system. Students enrolled in the 500-level course will be required to complete additional work as stated in the syllabus.

CVEN 539 Advanced Topics in Geotechnical Engineering (3)
This course covers study relating to specialized topics associated with geotechnical engineering

CVEN 546 Env. Engineering and Science (3)
This course covers advanced topics on sources, characteristics, transport, and effects of air and water contaminants; biological, chemical, and physical processes in water; atmospheric structure and composition; unit operations for air and water quality control; solid waste management; and environmental quality standards. Discusses risk assessment, toxicology, and regulations governing environmental contaminants as well as environmental restoration.

CVEN 551 Travel Demand Modeling (3)
This course examines the estimation of current and future travel demand, how that demand will be distributed onto the network, and the analysis of the impact of increased future demand on current management decisions.

CVEN 552 Traffic Flow Theory (3)
This course examines the behavior of drivers as they travel in groups called traffic streams as well as their individual behavior in car-following. The course will utilize models currently used in practice in the analysis of driver behavior and roadway capacity.

CVEN 554 Traffic Psychology (3)
This course explores the human factors aspect of transportation focusing on the application of various disciplines of psychology in order to create a deeper understanding of the way humans interact in transportation networks.

CVEN 555 OR Models for Transportation (3)
This course examines different techniques used to solve complex transportation management decisions in the form of linear and non-linear programs. This course covers the fundamentals of optimization and the mathematical proofs behind the Simplex method.

CVEN 559 Advanced Topics in Transportation Engineering (3)
The course covers study relating to specialized topics associated with transportation engineering

CVEN 562 Reliability and Optimization Methods in Engineering (3)
This course will provide an advanced general survey of the complete field of Reliability and Optimization in various engineering applications. The course is designed to give a thorough philosophical base for Reliability and Optimization in engineering and mathematical techniques used along with common examples of application for engineering structures, components and systems.

CVEN 563 Sensing and Data Analytics for Infrastructure Systems (3)
This course will introduce the sensing and data analytics techniques across a broad range of engineering disciplines with a focus on urban infrastructure systems. This course will empower students with a basic and advanced skill set on sensing and data analytics and an ability to directly apply these tools for practical engineering problems.

CVEN 590 Special Topics in Civil Engineering (3)
This course covers study of topics in civil engineering relating to the special needs and interests of individual students.

CVEN 599 Master’s Project (3)
A supervised project for graduate civil engineering student’s equivalent to 3 credit-credit course in Civil Engineering. Topics to be determined by student and supervisor.

CVEN 625 Water Resources System Analysis (3)
This course covers planning, design and management of multi-component water resources systems. After a review of the use and nature of water resources systems, topics studied in detail are: water resource economics; methodology of design; systems analysis; systems design and decision making; applied mathematical programming; probabilistic models and water quantity and quality modeling.

CVEN 651 Computational Engineering and Scientific Modeling (3)
Use cloud, supercomputer, and even normal desktop computer (GPU or CPU based). An engineer or scientist with little to no expertise to understand the limits and capabilities of different computational systems. This may be a unique course. I can assist/co-teach such course at opportune time.

CVEN 652 Systems Engineering Approach (3)
Engineering of complex hardware, software systems encompasses quantitative methods to understand vague problem statements, determine what a proposed product/system must do (functionality), generate measurable requirements, decide how to select the most appropriate solution design, integrate the hardware and software subsystems and test the finished product to verify it satisfies the documented requirements. Additional topics that span the entire product life cycle include interface management and control, risk management, tailing of process to meet organizational and project environments, configuration management, test strategies and trade-off studies.

CVEN 653 Engineering Systems: Modeling & Simulation (3)
This course will present principles of computational modeling and simulation of systems. General topics covered include parametric and non-parametric modeling; system simulation; parameter estimation, linear regression and least squares; model structure and model validation through simulation; and, numerical issues in systems theory. Techniques covered include methods from numerical linear algebra, nonlinear programming and Monte Carlo simulation, with applications to general engineering systems. Modeling and simulation software is utilized in this course.

CVEN 654 Water Resources System Analysis (3)
This course covers planning, design and management of multi-component water resources systems. After a review of the use and nature of water resources systems, topics studied in detail are: water resource economics; methodology of design; systems analysis; systems design and decision making; applied mathematical programming; probabilistic models and water quality modeling.

CVEN 655 Water Resources System Modeling (3)
Water resources systems are physically complex and the solution of appropriate mathematical models is computationally demanding. This course considers physical processes in water resource systems, their mathematical representation and numerical solutions. This course covers meteorologic data analysis, deterministic and stochastic modeling techniques; Flood control: structural and nonstructural alternatives and Urban drainage and runoff control, risk analysis, economics and decision making.

CVEN 669 Special Topics in Civil Engineering (3)
Covers a specific area related to civil engineering that is not normally covered in regular Ph.D. classes.

CVEN 699 Master’s Thesis (3)A supervised research thesis course. Topics to be determined by student and supervisor.


Subject Codes:           APCT            BMEG            CCEN            CMOP            CSCI            CVEN            ELEC            MECH


ELEC Electrical Engineering

ELEC 225 Electrical Circuits (3)
Description, analysis, simulation, and Design, of electric circuits. Basic concepts and laws of electrical circuits such as Ohm’s and Kirchoff’s laws, Thevenin and Norton theorems and equivalents, DC and AC steady-state analysis of simple circuits, transient analysis of first and second-order circuits, frequency response and transfer functions of first and second-order circuits, and ideal op-amp circuits and diode circuits. Lec. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PHYS 201, PHYS 205. Co-req: ELEC 226..

ELEC 226 Electrical Circuits Laboratory (1)
A laboratory course to accompany Electrical Circuits. This course is the first in a sequence of laboratory courses intended to develop a strong foundation in designing, assembling, and testing electrical circuits. Lab 1 hrs. Prerequisite: PHYS 201, PHYS 205, Coreq: ELEC 225.

ELEC 241 Assembly Language and Microprocessors (3)
Concepts of assembly language and the machine representation of instructions and data of a modern digital computer are presented. Students will have the opportunity to study machine addressing, stack operations, subroutines, and programmed and interrupt driven I/O. Also, basic concepts of machine organization are studied. This will include computer architecture at the register level, micro-operation components of instructions and hardware interfaces.  Lec. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: APCT 231, APCT 233. Co-req.: ELEC 242

ELEC 242 Assembly Language and Microprocessors Laboratory (1)
A laboratory course to accompany the Assembly and Microprocessors lecture course. Students will have the opportunity to develop assembly language programs utilizing machine addressing, stack operations, subroutines, and programmed and interrupt driven I/O.  Lab:1 hrs. Prerequisite: APCT 231, APCT 233. Co-req.: ELEC 241.

ELEC 301 Engineering Mathematics (3)
Covers Fourier series and integral, Laplace transform, periodic functions, partial differential equations, Bessel functions and Legendre polynomials, complex analytic functions, and Taylor and Laurent series. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: MATH 260.

ELEC 307 Probability and Statistics for Engineers (3)
Covers purpose of statistics, methods of representation, sample mean, sample variance, random experiments, probability, random variable, discrete and continuous distributions, binomial, Poisson and normal distribution sampling. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: MATH 152, MATH 156.

ELEC 308 Applied Numerical Analysis For Engineers (3)
Covers systems of linear equations: elimination, iteration, relaxation methods, eigenvalue problems, nonlinear equations, numerical differentiation and integration, interpolation methods of finite differences. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: MATH 260.

ELEC 315 Computer Organization (3)
Covers foundations of digital design and digital computer systems, representation of information using the binary number system, introduction to Boolean algebra, design of combinational logic circuits, design of sequential logic circuits, design of registers, counters and memory units, synchronous sequential circuit analysis and design, finite state-machine, and introduction to the use of hardware description languages and programmable logic devices. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 225, ELEC 226. Co-req.: ELEC 316.

ELEC 316 Computer Organization Laboratory (1)
A Lab course to accompany the Computer Organization course. Covers the design of combinational logic circuits, sequential logic circuits, registers, counters and memory units, synchronous sequential circuit, finite state-machine. Extensive use of hardware description languages and programmable logic devices. Lab. 1 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 225, ELEC 226. Co-req.: ELEC 315.

ELEC 351 Electronics I Lecture (3)
Covers semiconductor diodes, bipolar junction transistors (BJT), and junction field effect transistors (JFET); design of BJT and JFET amplifiers, and computer-aided design and circuit simulation. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 225, ELEC 226. Co-req.: ELEC 353.

ELEC 352 Electronics II Lecture (3)
Covers operational amplifiers, frequency response characteristics of transistor amplifiers, feedback amplifiers, oscillators, filters, and pulsed wave-forms. Computer-aided design and circuit simulation. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 351, ELEC 353. Co-req.: ELEC 354.

ELEC 353 Electronics I Laboratory (1)
A laboratory course to accompany Electronics I. Includes experiments on discrete transistor characteristics and circuits. Lab 3 hrs., Co-req.: ELEC 351.

ELEC 354 Electronics II Laboratory (1)
Continues Electronics Lab I. Includes experiments on design of amplifiers and op-amp circuits. Lab 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 351, ELEC 353. Co-req.: ELEC 352.

ELEC 356 Physical Electronics (3)
Covers the growth and properties of physical and optical semiconductor materials; kinetics of charge carriers in electronic devices; design, fabrication, and operation of integrated circuits and devices, and optoelectronic devices including LEDs, lasers and, solar cells. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: PHYS 203, PHYS 207.

ELEC 361 Electromagnetic Theory (3)
Covers vector calculus, orthogonal coordinates, Coulomb and Gauss laws, scalar potentials, dielectrics, capacitance, and static electric and magnetic fields and their interaction with matter, as well as Laplace and Poisson equations. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: PHYS 201, PHYS 205, ELEC 225, ELEC 226

ELEC 362 Electromagnetic Theory II (3)
Continues of ELEC 361 with emphasis on Ampere’s law, Biot-Savart Law, vector potential, magnetic circuits, Faraday’s Law, the application of Maxwell’s equations, plane waves, and the Poynting vector. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 361.

ELEC 371 Signals and Systems I (3)
Introduces principles and techniques of continuous and discrete time linear systems analysis. Topics include signal representation, properties of systems, convolution, Fourier series and transform, FFT, sampling theorem, filtering, Laplace and Z-transform techniques. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 351, ELEC 353, ELEC 301. Co-req.: ELEC 374.

ELEC 374 Signals and Systems I Lab (1)
A lab accompanying ELEC 371 to introduce students to Signals and Systems through MATLAB. Lab. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 351, ELEC 353, ELEC 301. Co-req.:ELEC 371

ELEC 410 Comms. and Security For Smart Grid (3)
This course informs the students of the various communication technologies that are essential in the evolution of a Smart Grid and will train the students about the types of cyber-attacks on the Smart Grid, privacy and security issues and their possible solutions. Through this course the students are expected to gain an in-depth knowledge about the communication and security aspects of a Smart Grid. Students are expected to finish a course project and made presentations in class. Lecture 3, Credit 3. Prerequisite: ELEC 467.

ELEC 420 Power Electronics (3)
This power electronics course Introduces basic topologies of power switching circuits, switching characteristics of semiconductor devices including IGBT transistors, modeling, design, analysis, and control of DC/DC converters, AC/DC rectifiers, DC/AC inverters, AC/AC cycle converter, and switch- mode power supplies and power electronics applications in motor drives, uninterrupted power supplies, power systems, high frequency energy conversion, and renewable energy systems. Software and hardware are used in the lab to design and analyze power electronics circuits in real time.  Lecture 3, Credit 3. Prerequisite: ELEC 352, ELEC 354.

CVEN 441 Wastewater Engineering (3)
Covers analysis and design of wastewater systems; unit operations and treatment kinetics; physical, chemical, and biological unit processes; principles of design of facilities for physical, chemical and biological treatment of wastewater; disposal of waste solids. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: CVEN 325 and CVEN 327.

CVEN 446 Env. Engineering and Science (3)
This course covers sources, characteristics, transport, and effects of air and water contaminants; biological, chemical, and physical processes in water; atmospheric structure and composition; unit operations for air and water quality control; solid waste management; and environmental quality standards. Discusses risk assessment, toxicology, and regulations governing environmental contaminants as well as environmental restoration. Pre-req. CHEM 111 and/or CVEN 251

CVEN 449 Environmental Engineering (3)
Covers hydrology; ground water; physical, chemical, and biological properties of water; introduction to water and wastewater treatment processes; physical and chemical fundamentals of air pollution; solid waste management. Introductory course for environmental engineering. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: CVEN 325.

ELEC 455 Adaptive Filters (3)
The theory and design techniques of finite-impulse response filters. Stationary discrete-time stochastic processes, Wiener filter theory, the method of steepest descent, adaptive transverse filters using gradient-vector estimation, analysis of the LMS and RLS algorithm. Adaptive filters design and software/hardware implementations. Application examples in noise canceling, channel equalization, and array processing. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 458.

ELEC 457 Digital Electronics (3)
Introduces integrated circuit (IC) technology. Digital logic families (TTL, TTL (LS), NMOS, CMOS, ECL, IC’s) and digital IC’s, examples of digital and analog IC design, memory circuits are also examined. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 352, ELEC 354.

ELEC 458 Digital Signal Processing I (3)
Time and frequency analysis of discrete- time signals and systems, sampling theorem, Z-transform, FFT techniques. Fast implementations of the DFT and its relatives. IIR and FIR digital filter design, implementation, and quantization error analysis. Decimation, interpolation and introduction to multirate digital signal processing. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 371, ELEC 374.

ELEC 459 Introduction to Digital Computer Architecture and Design (3)
Provides an understanding of the structure and operation of contemporary computer systems from the instruction set architecture level through the register transfer implementation level. Also explores theory and application of computation, levels of abstraction, instruction set design, assembly language programming, processor data paths, data path control, pipeline design, design of memory hierarchies, memory management, and input/output. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 241, ELEC 242, ELEC 315, ELEC 316, ELEC 480, ELEC 483.

ELEC 460 Antenna Design Theory Lab (1)
This laboratory course accompanies ELEC 466 and emphasizes the hands-on analysis/design of operational antennas with the aid of modern equipment for measurement and testing. Various software packages are applied in the Lab; 3 hrs.; Co-req.: ELEC 466.

ELEC 461 Electrical Energy Conversion (3)
Covers theory of electromechanical energy conversion, DC motors and generators, power electronics, AC rotating machine theory. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 352, ELEC 354. Co-req.: ELEC 462.

ELEC 462 Electrical Energy Conversion Laboratory (1)
Includes experiments on DC and AC motors and generators. Lab 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 352, ELEC 354. Co-req.: ELEC 461.

ELEC 463 Energy Systems (3)
Examines principles of electrical power generation, transmission, and distribution with applications to present energy problems. Lec. 2 hrs., ELEC 352, ELEC 354, ELEC 362.

ELEC 464 Digital Image Processing (3)
Fundamental principles and algorithms for digital image processing. Two-dimensional spatial frequency transforms. Image enhancement, histogram equalization, smoothing and sharpening. Image encoding, analysis, and segmentation. Feature extraction, and object and pattern recognition. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 458.

ELEC 465 Introduction to Microwaves (3)
Covers the analysis and design of transmission lines, microwave systems, and wave-guides. Smith chart characteristics, active and passive components, and measurement techniques. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 362.

ELEC 466 Antenna Design Theory and Applications (3)
Covers the design and construction of operational antennas and testing of the antennas so that students get an understanding of most types of antennas in common use. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq: ELEC 362, ELEC 465. Co-req.: ELEC 460.

ELEC 467 Fundamentals of Communication Systems Lecture (3)
Introduces concepts underlying analog and digital communication systems, including amplitude modulation, phase and frequency modulation, sampling and quantization theory, and pulse modulation. Covers effect of noise on the performance of these techniques. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq: ELEC 307, ELEC 371, ELEC 374. Co-req.: ELEC 476.

ELEC 468 Wireless Communications (3)
Cellular radio concepts: frequency reuse and handoff strategies. Large scale path loss models; fading and multipath: flat fading versus frequency selective fading; modulation schemes for mobile communication: narrowband versus spread spectrum; equalization; RAKE receiver; multiple access techniques; FDMA, CDMA; and co-channel interference and channel capacity. Common wireless standards. Lec. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ELEC 467 and ELEC 476.

ELEC 469 Digital Communications I (3)
Basis functions, orthogonalization of signals, vector representation of signals, optimal detection in noise, matched filters, pulse shaping, inter-symbol interference, maximum likelihood detection, channel cutoff rates, error probabilities, bandwidth, and power-limited signaling. Basics modulations schemes: ASK, FSK, PSK, QAM. Prereq: ELEC 467.

ELEC 470 Introduction to Control Systems & Applications (3)
Examines various techniques available for analysis and design of continuous time and discrete time feedback control systems. Topics include modeling, performance measures, transfer functions, generalized error coefficient, introduction to state-space methods, stability, controllability and observability, root locus and frequency domain analysis, compensation methods, state feedback and pole placements control system design Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 371, ELEC 374. Co-req.: ELEC 477

ELEC 471 Digital Control Systems (3)
Introduces the analysis and design of digital control systems, Z-transform, discrete linear systems, state-space and frequency domain analysis, and simulation and analysis using microprocessors. Prereq: ELEC 470, ELEC 477.

ELEC 472 Signals and Systems II (3)
Provides mathematical tools for analysis of time-invariant and time-varying linear systems. State-space approach to analysis of systems is covered. Nonlinear and multi-variable systems are introduced. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq: ELEC 371, ELEC 374.

ELEC 473 Digital Comms. Systems Laboratory (1)
This is a laboratory course in digital communication. Experiments include sampling, frequency division, multiplexing and pulse code modulation. It also includes simulation techniques of digital communication systems. The course is intended to supplement the course ELEC 469, Prerequisite: ELEC 467, ELEC 476, ELEC 307. Co-req: ELEC 469

ELEC 474 Adv. Topics in Electrical Engineering I (3)
Senior elective. Topic is to be chosen from one of the many concentrations of electrical engineering. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

ELEC 475 Adv. Topics in Electrical Engineering II (3)
Senior elective. Continuation of ELEC 474. Lec 3 hours, Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

ELEC 476 Fundamentals of Comms. Systems Lab (1)
This is a laboratory course in RF and digital communication. Experiments include operation of phase-locked loop, AM and FM modulation, frequency division multiplexing, and pulse-code modulation. Lab 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 307, ELEC 371, ELEC 374., Co-req.: ELEC 467.

ELEC 477 Introduction to Control Systems & Applications Lab (1)
Experiments include simulation of continuous time and discrete time feedback control systems, such as modeling, performance measures, transfer functions, generalized error coefficient, introduction to state-space methods, stability, controllability and observability, root locus and frequency domain analysis, compensation methods, state feedback and pole placements control system design. Lab 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 371, ELEC 374. Co-req.: ELEC 470.

ELEC 478 Digital Integrated Circuit Design Lecture (3)
Studies the design process of VLSI CMOS circuits. Also covers all the major steps of the design process, including logic, circuit, and layout design. A variety of computer-aided tools are discussed and used to provide VLSI design experience that includes design of basic VLSI CMOS functional blocks, and verification of the design, testing, and debugging procedures. Lec. 3 hrs., : ELEC 315, ELEC 316, ELEC 352, ELEC 354, Co-requisite: ELEC 479.

ELEC 479 Digital Integrated Circuit Design Lab (1)
Provides VLSI design experience that includes design of basic VLSI CMOS functional blocks, verification of the design, testing, and debugging. Several complex VLSI projects will be submitted for fabrication. Prerequisite: ELEC 315, ELEC 316, ELEC 352, ELEC 354. Co-req.: ELEC 478.

ELEC 480 Digital System Design and Synthesis (3)
This introductory level VHDL course covers coding styles and methodology used for testing hardware component and FPGA, or system. The course emphasizes the use of computer-aided design (CAD) tools in the description, modeling, and design of digital systems. The use of Field Programmable gate arrays is integrated into the course as the target physical domain. The main characteristics of the Verilog Language will also be discussed. Prerequisite: ELEC 315, ELEC 316. Co-requisite: ELEC 483.

ELEC 483 Digital System Design and Synthesis Laboratory (1)
The course emphasizes the use of computer-aided design (CAD) tools in the description, modeling, simulation, verification and testing of digital systems. Alternative coding styles and methodology used for combinational and sequential digital logic designs are evaluated. The use of Field Programmable gate arrays is integrated into the course as the target physical domain. Lab 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 315, ELEC 316, Co-requisite: ELEC 480.

ELEC 495 Senior Project I (3)
Conceptualization, design, building, testing, and promulgation of an electrical engineering project is carried out by the student under supervision of a faculty member. Lab 6 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 315, ELEC  316, ELEC 352, ELEC 354, ELEC 371, ELEC 374.

ELEC 496 Senior Project II (3)
Continues the design project, Senior Project I. Students will consider feasibility of design project, the effect of economic factors on the design, and make presentations in oral and written form for evaluation. Lab 6 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 495.

ELEC 507 Probability and Random Processes (3)
Foundations for the engineering analysis of random processes: Review of probability theory, Introduction to stochastic processes, Continuous time and discrete time processes, Mean functions, correlation functions, covariance functions, noise, Strict- and wide-sense stationarity, ergodicity, Gaussian processes, power spectral densities, mean square estimation, Markov processes. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ELEC 510 Comms. and Security For Smart Grid (3)
This course informs the students of the various communication technologies that are essential in the evolution of a Smart Grid and will train the students about the types of cyber-attacks on the Smart Grid, privacy and security issues and their possible solutions. Through this course the students are expected to gain an in-depth knowledge about the communication and security aspects of a Smart Grid. Students are expected to finish a course project and made presentations in class. Lecture 3, Credit 3. Prereq: Consent of instructor.

ELEC 520 Power Electronics (3)
This power electronics course Introduces basic topologies of power switching circuits, switching characteristics of semiconductor devices including IGBT transistors, modeling, design, analysis, and control of DC/DC converters, AC/DC rectifiers, DC/AC inverters, AC/AC cycle converter, and switch- mode power supplies and power electronics applications in motor drives, uninterrupted power supplies, power systems, high frequency energy conversion, and renewable energy systems. Software and hardware are used in the lab to design and analyze power electronics circuits in real time. Lecture 3, Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ELEC 555 Adaptive Filters (3)
The theory and design techniques of finite-impulse response filters. Stationary discrete-time stochastic processes, Wiener filter theory, the method of steepest descent, adaptive transverse filters using gradient-vector estimation, analysis of the LMS and RLS algorithm. Adaptive filters design and software/hardware implementations. Application examples in noise canceling, channel equalization, and array processing. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 558.

ELEC 558 Digital Signal Processing I (3)
Time and frequency analysis of discrete- time signals and systems, sampling theorem, Z-transform, FFT techniques. Fast implementations of the DFT and its relatives. IIR and FIR digital filter design, implementation, and quantization error analysis. Decimation, interpolation and introduction to multirate digital signal processing. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ELEC 559 Computer Architecture (3)
Advanced computer architectures with emphasis on multiprocessor systems and the principles of their design and cost/performance factors. Instruction set design and implementation, RISC vs. CISC instruction sets; datapath and controller design, pipeline design; fixed and floating-point arithmetic; memory hierarchy designs, caches, memory systems; I/O systems and their interconnect. Interrupt and exception. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ELEC 564 Digital Image Processing (3)
Fundamental principles and algorithms for digital image processing. Two-dimensional spatial frequency transforms. Image enhancement, histogram equalization, smoothing and sharpening. Image encoding, analysis, and segmentation. Feature extraction, and object and pattern recognition. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 558.

ELEC 568 Wireless Communications (3)
Cellular radio concepts: frequency reuse and handoff strategies. Large scale path loss models; fading and multipath: flat fading versus frequency selective fading; modulation schemes for mobile communication: narrowband versus spread spectrum; equalization; RAKE receiver; multiple access techniques; FDMA, CDMA; and co-channel interference and channel capacity. Common wireless standards. Lec. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ELEC 569 Digital Communications I (3)
Basis functions, orthogonalization of signals, vector representation of signals, optimal detection in noise, matched filters, pulse shaping, inter-symbol interference, maximum likelihood detection, channel cutoff rates, error probabilities, bandwidth, and power-limited signaling. Basics modulations schemes: ASK, FSK, PSK, QAM. Lec. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ELEC 571 Linear Systems (3)
Methods of linear-system analysis, in both time and frequency domains, are studied. Techniques used in the study of continuous and discrete systems include state-variable representation, matrices, Fourier transforms, Laplace transforms, inversion theorems, sampling theory, discrete and fast Fourier transforms, and Z-transforms. Computer simulation, analysis, and design software packages are used. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ELEC 574 Digital Information Theory (3)
Entropy and mutual information, Huffman coding, Shannon’s source coding theorem, channel capacity, block coding error bounds, random coding bounds, multi-user information theory, random access channels and protocols, multi-access coding methods, network information theory. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 507 or consent of instructor.

ELEC 575 Wireless Networks (3)
Fundamental concepts of wireless networks: network architecture for personal communications systems, wireless LANs, radio, tactical and other wireless networks, and design and analysis of protocols on a regular basis. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 568.

ELEC 578 Digital Integrated Circuit Design Lecture (3)
Studies the design process of VLSI CMOS circuits. Also covers all the major steps of the design process, including logic, circuit, and layout design. A variety of computer-aided tools are discussed and used to provide VLSI design experience that includes design of basic VLSI CMOS functional blocks, and verification of the design, testing, and debugging procedures. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Co-requisite: ELEC 579.

ELEC 580 Digital System Design and Synthesis (3)
This introductory level VHDL course covers coding styles and methodology used for testing hardware component and FPGA, or system. The course emphasizes the use of computer-aided design (CAD) tools in the description, modeling, and design of digital systems. The use of Field Programmable gate arrays is integrated into the course as the target physical domain. The main characteristics of the Verilog Language will also be discussed. Prereq: Consent of instructor.

ELEC 584 Digital System-level Design (3)
Digital system designs for Digital System Processors and Communications systems: Applications include matched filters, FFT, QAM Modulators, Raised Cosine Filter, Reed-Solomon and hamming code decoders, error detection and correction circuits, demodulation, and soft and hard decision decoders. Extensive use of hardware and software system-level design tools and packages. Prerequisite: ELEC 580 or consent of instructor.

ELEC 585 Design of a System on a Chip (SoC) (3)
System-level design and optimization of multiprocessor systems on a reconfigurable chip. System-level design methodologies. System level design representations and modeling languages. System level modeling. System specification, algorithm modeling, decomposition, IP selection. Synthesis and co-verification of system components. Extensive use of state-of-the-art of CAD tools and FPGA boards. Lab 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 580 or consent of instructor.

ELEC 586 Advanced Embedded System Design (3)
Advanced embedded system design principles and practices. Emphasizes formal design methodologies such as hardware-software co-design and co-verification, performance optimization, distributed embedded systems. Soft core and hard core embedded microprocessors. Prerequisite: ELEC 480 or ELEC 580 or consent of instructor.

ELEC 599 Master’s Project (3)
Lab 3 hrs, Prereq: Graduate Standing or consent of instructor.

ELEC 631 Advanced Computational Intelligence (3)
Topics covered in this course include pattern classification, supervised learning, unsupervised learning, data clustering, time series prediction, feature selection and extraction, decision tree learning, neural networks, support vector machine, and others. Implement computational intelligence algorithms.

ELEC 632 Advanced Computer Architecture (3)
High performance computer architectures: instruction set principles, pipelining, multiprocessing systems, parallel processing, instruction level parallelism, fine-grain and coarse grain parallelism, SIMD, MIMD, multiple instruction issue, data coherency, memory hierarchy design, interconnection networks, vector processors.

ELEC 633 Advanced Embedded System design (3 credits)
Advanced embedded system design principles and practices. Emphasizes formal design methodologies such as hardware-software co-design and co-verification, performance optimization, distributed embedded systems. Soft core and hard-core embedded microprocessors.

ELEC 634 Detection and Estimation (3)
Estimation of unknown parameters, Cramer-Rao lower bound; optimum (map) demodulation; filtering, amplitude and angle modulation, comparison with conventional systems; statistical decision theory Bayes, minimax, Neyman/Pearson, Criteria for simple and composite hypotheses; application to coherent and incoherent signal detection; M-ary hypotheses; application to uncoded and coded digital communication systems.

ELEC 635 VLSI Architecture (3)
MOS transistors: fabrication, layout, characterization; CMOS circuit and logic design: circuit and logic simulation, fully complementary CMOS logic, pseudo- nMOS logic, dynamic CMOS logic, pass-transistor logic, clocking strategies; sub system design: ALUs, multipliers, memories, PLAs; architecture design: datapath, floor planning, iterative cellular arrays, systolic arrays; VLSI algorithms; chip design and test: full custom design of chips, possible chip fabrication by MOSIS and subsequent chip testing.

ELEC 636 Advanced Electronic Materials and Devices (3)
Operating principles, fabrication, characteristics and applications of advanced electronic devices will be covered. Core topics are as follows: ideal properties of electron gas; electronic states in bulk GaAs and at the heterojunctions; doping properties in heterostructures; electron transport properties at 2D interfaces (including resonant tunneling); electronic and optical properties at 2D interfaces; device applications (HEMT, HBT, QWLaser, QDLaser), low-dimensional and nanometer-scale device physics, magnetic & ferroelectric devices, single-electron transistors, quantum devices, and RTD’s.

ELEC 637 Advanced Communication Systems (3)
Basis functions, orthogonalization of signals, vector representation of signals, optimal detection in noise, matched filters, pulse shaping, intersymbol interference, maximum likelihood detection, channel cutoff rates, error probabilities, bandwidth, and power-limited signaling.

ELEC 649 Special Topics in Computer Eng. (3)
Covers a specific area related to electrical and computer engineering that is not normally covered in regular Ph.D. classes.

ELEC 658 Digital Signal Processing II (3)
Overview of z-transform, FFT, llR and FIR filters. Multirate digital signal processing. Optimum filtering of noisy signals. Adaptive digital filters. Power spectrum estimation. Wavelet transform. Interference canceling. Selected applications of DSP techniques in speech, communications and image processing. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite ELEC 558.

ELEC 659 Advanced Computer Architecture (3)
High performance computer architectures: instruction set principles, pipelining, multiprocessing systems, parallel processing, instruction level parallelism, fine grain and coarse grain parallelism, SIMD, MIMD, multiple instruction issue, data coherency, memory hierarchy design, interconnection networks, vector processors. Prerequisite: ELEC 559.

ELEC 665 Multimedia Communications (3)
Comprehensive coverage of media compression, synthesis and recognition, media communications and networking, and standards for audiovisual communications over wired and wireless networks. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 569.

ELEC 669 Digital Communications II (3)
The theory and practice of efficient digital modulations over linear dispersive channels, including adaptive equalization and synchronization, multiuser detection, Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 569.

ELEC 673 Coding Theory and Applications (3)
The theory and practice of error control coding with emphasis on linear, cyclic, convolutional, and parallel concatenated codes (Hamming codes, Repetition codes, polynomial codes, Reed Solomon Codes). Turbo codes, Viterbi decoding and applications. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 569.

ELEC 678 Advanced Digital Integrated Circuit Design Lecture (3)
Design and implementation of very-large-scale integrated systems (VLSI) with emphasis on full-custom chip design. Topics will include device and interconnect modeling, static and dynamic logic families, latch and flop design, RAM design, ALU design, low power techniques, power supply and clock distribution, signal integrity, and I/O design. Extensive use of CAD tools for IC design, simulation, and layout verification. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: ELEC 478 or ELEC 578.

ELEC 689 Special Topics in Electrical Eng. (3)
This course will cover different areas as Machine Learning, Game Theory, Deep Learning, Reinforcement Learning, Advanced Electrical and Computer Engineering topics. Prerequisites will be decided by the instructor.

ELEC 692 Advanced Topics in Signal and Image Processing (3)
Topics of current interest in signal and image processing. Content may vary from offering to offering. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ELEC 693 Adv Topics in Digital Communications (3)
Topics of current interest in digital communications. Content may vary from offering to offering. Lec. 3 hrs., Prerequisite: Graduate Standing or consent of instructor.

ELEC 699 Master’s Thesis (3-6)
Lab 6 hrs, Prerequisite: Graduate Standing or consent of instructor..

 


Subject Codes:           APCT            BMEG            CCEN            CMOP            CSCI            CVEN            ELEC            MECH


MECH Mechanical Engineering

MECH 107 Mechanical Engineering Computer Graphics (3)
This course provides students with hands-on, practical application of graphical modeling to create 3D parts for product design and manufacturing. The main objective is to familiarize students with the CREO software so that they may demonstrate competency in generating 3D models of both existing and new components. Finally they will produce a physical rendering of their model using 3D printing. This course will lay the foundation for the Advanced Manufacturing course. Lec. 3 hrs.

MECH 108 Programming for Engineers (1)
Introduction to programming for engineers and scientists. This course introduces the fundamental techniques for software development for solving engineering problems using high-level programming languages that are widely used within the engineering discipline. Topics include fundamental data and control structures and I/O functions with focus on engineering applications. The course emphasizes modern engineering principles including object oriented design, design decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, modularity, testing, debugging and reuse. Lab 3 hrs.

MECH 205 Materials Science (3)
This course provides an introduction to engineering materials with an emphasis on how atomic and molecular bonding, crystal structure, composition and processing influence material properties. This course covers the topics of electronic structure, crystal structure, and imperfections in metals, ceramics and polymers; elastic and plastic deformation; deformation processes and mechanical failure; diffusion, phase diagrams and transformations. Lec 3 hrs. Prereq.: CHEM 111.

MECH 206 Mechanics of Materials (3)
This course provides students with an understanding of the relationship between the external forces applied to a structure and the resulting behavior and deformation of the parts of that structure. Topics covered include: axial forces, shear and moment, stress and axial loads, strain and axial deformation, torsion of shafts, stress in beams, columns, deflection of beams, and elemental indeterminate problems. This course lays foundation for engineering design. Lec. 3 hrs.; Prereq.: MECH-205, CVEN-201, Co-req: MECH 207.

MECH 207 Mechanics of Materials Laboratory (1)
Covers introduction, purpose, scope, equipment/apparatus, interpreting results, uncertainty and error analysis, and writing reports. Experiments include physical properties and mechanical response of engineering materials, stress and strain measurement, thermal expansion, torque, bending moment, and deflection of beams. Lab 3 hrs., Co-req: MECH 206.

MECH 208 Thermodynamics (3)
Covers thermodynamic concepts, zeroth law, thermodynamic properties, first law and second law analysis of closed and open systems; availability and irreversibility analysis; power and refrigeration cycles; mixture of gases and psychrometrics. Lec. 3 hrs.; Prereq.: PHYS 201.

MECH 222 Engineering Measurements (3)
Covers statistical data and error analysis; measuring systems, transducers; property measurements; signal conditioning; data output and analysis; analog and digital circuits; computer applications; Lec. 3 hrs.; Prereq.: ELEC 225, Co-req: MECH 224.

MECH 224 Engineering Measurements Laboratory (1)
Involves experimentation in the measurements of different mechanical properties using analog and digital systems; use of sensors and transducers, and modern instrumentation technology. Lab 3 hrs.; Co-req: MECH 222.

MECH 302 Research Experience for Undergraduates (3)
This course will provide understanding of basic elements of research in the context of science and engineering and will involve the student in hands-on, cutting edge research not possible through regular courses in the curriculum. Students will also gain valuable skills in communicating technical results. Lec+Lab 3 hrs. Prereq.: CCEN 101.

MECH 305 Electronics and Instrumentation (3)
Examines an extension of the physics topics learned in electricity and magnetism. The student is introduced to the application of the fundamental principles of DC and AC circuits, their essential components and analysis. Three-phase energy distribution systems are described. Selected aspects of solid state electronics, especially devices with application in civil and mechanical engineering, are explored. Lec. 3 hrs. Pre-req.: PHYS 202.

MECH 321 Fluid Mechanics (3)
Covers fluid properties and definitions, fluid statics, Archimedes principles, kinematics of fluids, control volume equations and analysis, Bernoulli equation, Euler equation, ideal flow equations, velocity potential and stream function, dimensional analysis, and viscous flows in pipes. Lec. 3 hrs., Pre-req.: MATH 254 or MATH 260, MECH 208, Co-req.: MECH 322.

MECH 322 Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics Laboratory (1)
Examines methods of experimental fluid mechanics; and laboratory experiments in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics. Lab. 3 hrs., Co-req.: MECH 321.

MECH 341 Analysis and Synthesis of Mechanisms (3)
Covers kinematics and dynamics of mechanisms; analysis of mechanisms, including linkage, cam, gear, synthesis of mechanism for prescribed performances; and computer-aided design of mechanisms. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: CVEN 202.

MECH 342 Analysis of Dynamic Systems (3)
Covers mechanical vibrations of mechanical systems of single and multiple degrees of freedom, dynamic responses of engineering systems utilizing transfer function representation, and analysis of feed- back systems. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: CVEN 202, MATH 254 or MATH 260.

MECH 351 Heat Transfer (3)
Examines heat conduction equations, steady and unsteady state heat conduction problems; principles of heat convection, forced, free and phase-change convective heat transfer; and radiative physics and heat transfer. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: MECH 321, MATH 254 or MATH 260.

MECH 352 Robotics and Manufacturing Laboratory (1)
Provides a workshop practice course in metal cutting, forming, joining and fabrication. It includes laboratory experiments in pneumatic, hydraulic and electromechanical controls; experiments in computer-aided manufacturing; robot motions, control and programming. Lab. 3 hrs., Prereq.: MECH 205.
MECH 356 Modern Manufacturing Processes (3)
Covers engineering materials and manufacturing properties; production processes; mechanization and automation; CNC machining. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: MECH 205, CVEN 206.

MECH 361 Machine Design (3)
Examines engineering design process; theories of failure; fundamentals of mechanical design; and computer-aided design of machine elements, bearings, gears, shafts, brakes and couplings; design projects. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: CVEN 206, MECH 205, MECH 206.

MECH 371 Design of Control Systems (3)
Identifies and examines models of mechanical, electrical, fluid, thermal, electro-mechanical, thermofluid systems, transducers, digital devices, types of controllers, performance of feedback systems; simulation, root locus and frequency response methods for design of automatic control. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: MATH 254 or MATH 260, ELEC 225, Co-req.: MECH 373.

MECH 373 Design of Control Systems Laboratory (1)
Experiments illustrating the basic principles of three term (PID) thermal process control, multivariable systems and the basics of multivariable dynamics and control under steady state and transient conditions. Co-req. MECH 371.

MECH 381 Microcontrollers in Mechanical Engineering (3)
Study of microcontrollers and their applications as control devices in mechanical systems. Review of electric circuits and semiconductor devices; digital logic, Boolean algebra, logic gates; microcontroller architecture – internal data handling and control, input and output; microcontroller programming languages; digital sensing and control through parallel and serial communication; microcontroller interrupt programming and servicing; actuation control via digital to analog conversion; direct digital control of stepper motor actuator. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: ELEC 225 and Junior Standing.

MECH 405 Engineering Experimentation (3)
Covers experimentation theory; instrumentation systems; applications in mechanical engineering; microprocessors and peripherals; experiments in areas of mechanical engineering. Lec. 1 hr., Prac. 6 hrs., Prereq.: Senior standing in Mechanical Engineering.

MECH 406 Engineering Economics (3)
Studies the application of economic principles to engineering problems and their effects on engineering decision-making. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: Senior Standing.

MECH 456 Computational Fluid Mechanics (3)
Studies equations of continuum mechanics and boundary conditions; finite difference techniques for one and multi-directional Navier-Stokes equations; introduction to variational calculus; and finite element methods for fluid flow and heat transfer problems. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: MECH 321, MATH 254 or MATH 260.

MECH 457 Design for Noise Control (3)
Covers acoustic terminology, acoustic related to noise and its control, techniques for the solution of noise problems, design of vibration isolators, energy absorbers, dissipative and reactive mufflers, enclosures, barriers and panel damping. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: CVEN 202, MATH 254 or MATH 260.

MECH 458 Finite Element Methods for Mechanical Design (3)
Examines finite element techniques, data stringing, mesh generation, data checking, element calculation, post processing and output plots; use of finite element computer programs for solving design problems. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: MECH 361, MATH 254 or MATH 260.

MECH 461 Applied Thermodynamics and Energy Conversions (3)
Studies the optimization of power plant, internal combustion engine, refrigeration, combustion and direct thermoelectric systems; and design of reciprocating compressors, engines, nozzles and diffusers. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: MECH 351.

MECH 462 Design of Energy Systems (3)
Covers the design of ducting and piping systems, design of heat exchangers and fluid/rotor energy converters; characteristics of pumps, fans, compressors and turbines, computer-aided design and simulation of energy systems. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: MECH 351.

MECH 463 Mechanical Engineering Senior Laboratory I (1)
Studies dynamic data acquisition, analysis and control, aerodynamic lift and drag, pump performance, experimental methods for measuring dynamic responses, and statistical theories of measurement. Lab. 3 hrs., Prereq.: Senior standing.

MECH 464 Mechanical Engineering Senior Laboratory II (1)
Examines a computer simulation of dynamic systems, electronic and digital instruments, instrumentation and tests for measurement of performance of energy and dynamic system, and individual laboratory projects. Lab. 3 hrs., Prereq.: MECH 463.

MECH 465 Advance Manufacturing (3)
This course will provide understanding of the basic elements of advance manufacturing such as mode-based product design, metal and plastic 3D manufacturing. Lec. 3 hrs.

MECH 470 Thermal Environmental Engineering (3)
Examines thermodynamic properties of moist air, psychrometric chart applications, refrigerants, binary mixtures, mechanical vapor compression refrigeration systems, absorption refrigeration systems, solar radiation calculations, and analysis of cooling towers and dehumidification coils. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: MECH 351.

MECH 473 Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) (3)
Study of fabrication techniques for micro-electromechanical devices fabrication. Applications of MEMS such as mechanical, optical, magnetic, chemical/biological sensors/actuators are studied. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: MECH 205, MECH 321 or ELEC 352 and ELEC 312 for EE students.

MECH 475 Gas Turbine Design (3)
Covers gas turbine components, component characteristics and performance, gas turbine system configurations and optimization, energy transfer between fluid and rotors, aerodynamic data of turbine and compressor blades, aerodynamic design of turbine. Prereq.: MECH 321

MECH 476 HVAC Design (3)
From a description of building functions, students research, create, plan, and design an energy efficient and cost effective building HVAC system. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: MECH 461.

MECH 478 Mechatronics (3)

Fundamental concepts in mechatronics including instrumentation and measurements. Operating principles of electromechanical actuators, motors, sensors, drives, and analog motion control. Applications of microprocessors, and microprocessor interfacing to electromechanical systems. Prereq.: MECH 381 (or ELEC 352 and ELEC 312 for EE students), Senior Standing.

MECH 481 Fundamental of Eng. Preparation (1)
Discusses examination preparation materials for the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exams—commonly called the EIT exams. Provides a brief overview of common engineering courses. Prereq.: Senior Standing.

MECH 483 Robot Mechanics and Control (3)
Introduces types of industrial robots, sensing of robot motion and position, electro-mechanical, hydraulic and pneumatic actuators; sampled data, proportional, integral and derivative controller; robot coordinates, motion, dynamic and path control, as well as introduction to robot programming. Prereq.: MECH 341, MECH 371.

MECH 484 Design of Robot Mechanism (3)
Introduces types of manipulators, manipulator parts and linkages, kinematic equations and their solutions; synthesis of manipulator mechanisms, path generation and motion trajectories, manipulator dynamics, payload and compliance, and computer-aided design of manipulator mechanisms. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: MECH 483.

MECH 486 Robot Interface Design (3)
Covers microprocessor programming; control hardware characteristics; interfacing to robots, applications of electro-mechanical, hydraulic and pneumatic robots; robot programming languages; computerized numerical control, and design and optimization for manufacturing cells for specified manufacturing processes and cycles. Lec. 3 hrs., Prereq.: MECH 483.

MECH 487 Photovoltaic Cells and Solar Thermal Energy Systems (3)
The course focuses on science and technology of solar energy harvesting. Major focus will be on photovoltaics cells (PV). This course will teach science and technology of PV cells. Various complimentary systems required to channel energy from PV cells to electrical appliances will be discussed. This course will also introduce key developments to make PV cells economical and more energy efficient. During this course, we will also highlight the impact of governmental policies and socio-economic conditions on the proliferation of solar energy harvesting. Prereq.: Senior Standing.

MECH 488 Fuel Cell Fundamentals and Technologies (3)
Fuel cells are introduced as a renewable energy resource. This course covers the concepts and fundamentals of fuel cells. Various types of fuel cells will be discussed to give in-depth understanding of practical fuel cell device. Experiments will be conducted as necessary. Prereq.: Senior Standing.

MECH 491 Senior Design Project I (3)
Covers creative design, design problem formulation, structure of open-ended solution processes in system design; familiarization with technological resources; group projects on design of complex mechanical systems, feasibility studies, group presentation of project feasibility, and developing impact and planning statement. Lab 6 hrs., Prereq.: Senior Standing.

MECH 492 Senior Design Project II (3)
Continuation of group projects from Senior Design Project I, including consideration of economic, risk and reliability factors, and development of preliminary designs, prototypes, tests and optimization, and project report and presentation. Lab 6 hrs., Prereq.: MECH 491.

MECH 495 Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering (1-12)
Covers a specific area related to mechanical engineering that is not normally covered in regular courses and/or for which there is sufficient student interest. May be used as a technical elective. Lec. 1 hr., or Lab 3 hrs. for each credit hour. Prereq.: Permission of instructor.

MECH 496 Senior Proj. in Mech. Engineering (1-12)
Individual study by the student is conducted under supervision of a faculty member, on a project related to mechanical engineering, including presentation of project report. Lec. 1 hr. or Lab. 3 hrs. for each credit hour. Prereq.: Permission of instructor.

MECH 501 Mechatronics System Design (3)
Principles of transducers and sensors and how to interface them with a process in a computer environment. Discussion topics about types of transducers and different sensors include operating principles, modeling, design considerations, and applications. Computer interfacing work includes signal conversion, interface components, and real-time applications of microcomputer systems to problems in manufacturing. Component integration and design considerations are addressed by case histories presented by the instructor. Student design projects involve problems from industry that require computer interfacing and experimental techniques. Topics include principles of transducers and sensors, signal processing, data acquisition, and computer interfacing using case studies.

MECH 502 Product Design (3)
Principles of Design for Manufacturing, Integrated Product and Process Design, Part geometry and its effect on assembly. Several tools and methods for design for assembly and disassembly, product rating for assembly based on geometry or assembly motions, manufacturability evaluation methods. Emphasis on optimization tools, FMEA, root cause analysis and lean manufacturing on product design. Strategy for organizing design for manufacturing techniques in industry.

MECH 503 Finite Element Analysis (3)
Principles and applications of finite element methods. The principle of virtual work is used to develop finite element equations for the representation and analysis of engineering structures. Hand calculations and computer modeling are used to analyze two- and three-dimensional constructs.

MECH 505 Advanced Manufacturing (3)
Mechanics and thermal models of machining, machining economics and optimization. Stability analysis of machine tools. Specialized machine process such as EDM, ECM, laser, CVD and PVD processes.

MECH 506 Principles of Six Sigma (3)
Implementing the Six Sigma philosophy and methodology. Several tools and methods including process flow diagrams, cause and effect diagrams, failure mode and effects analysis, gage R&R, capability studies, and design of experiments. Strategy for organizing six sigma techniques in industry.

MECH 507 Supply Chain Engineering (3)
The course introduces the student to supply chains starting from the movement of raw materials and components into an organization, through internal processing of materials into finished goods, to the delivery of finished goods to the end-customer. The course introduces the key tactics such as risk pooling and inventory placement, integrated planning/collaboration and information sharing. The class also presents new opportunities and issues introduced by the internet and e-commerce, discusses models and software tools for logistics network design, capacity planning and integration with product development. All models and methods for supply chain analysis and optimization are presented via lectures, case studies and class projects.

MECH 511 Advanced Materials (3)
Introduction to properties and processes of production of high strength and/or high modulus of elasticity materials including composites, fibers, ceramics, polymers, and elastomers; principles of materials selection using modern software tools; survey of design, analysis, fabrication, and testing.

MECH 512 Advanced Mechatronics (3)
System design methods applied to intelligent electromechanical devices. Analysis of dynamic response, performance and reliability. Mechatronic design is able to optimize in a systematic manner the available methodologies to produce quality products in a timely manner. The course addresses the ideas of optimized design, modeling parameters of sensors and actuators and computer interfacing. Industrial case studies are discussed. The unifying factor of this course is the integration of various disciplines into a successful mechatronics design.

MECH 521 Rehabilitation Engineering (3)
This course is aimed to educate students on project definition, and the design, development and technology transfer of potential biomedical products (in particular, those used for patient rehabilitation). During lectures, case study examples will be provided. Students will learn best practices for bioengineering device development including: product development via design and process control, intellectual property and innovation in biomedical engineering (including patents), and clinical regulatory issues, including clinical trial design.

MECH 522 Physiological Systems Analysis ( 3)
This graduate-level course provides in-depth understanding of systems theory with applications and case studies from bioengineering and physiology (e.g., nerve function, muscle dynamics, cardiovascular regulation, physiologic feedback control systems, properties of muscle, cardiovascular function). Analyses within the course includes: differential equations, linear and nonlinear systems, stability, time and frequency domain methods, feedback control, and biological oscillations. Case studies readings and analysis of actual physiologic data will comprise a portion of this course, and further, students will work on a detailed research project throughout the term.

MECH 531 Intermediate Heat and Mass Transfer (3)
This course covers problems of heat and mass transfer in greater depth and complexity than is done in those courses and incorporates many subjects that are not included or are treated lightly in undergraduate heat transfer courses; analysis is given greater emphasis than the use of correlations.

MECH 532 Engineering Numerical Modeling Methods (3)
Numerical methods for solving problems arising in heat and mass transfer, fluid mechanics, energy engineering, biomedical and molecular simulation. Topics: numerical linear algebra, solution of nonlinear algebraic equations and ordinary differential equations, solution of partial differential equations (e.g. Navier-Stokes), numerical methods in molecular simulation (dynamics, geometry optimization). All methods are presented within the context of Mechanical Engineering problems.

MECH 533 Engineering Optimization (3)
This graduate course presents applied aspects of computational models and methods for single- and multi-objective design optimization with a focus on continuous variables. The course will involve an overview of design optimization models and methods and usage of Matlab and Excel optimization tools in homework and project assignments.

MECH 534 Failure Mechanism and Reliability (3)
Reliability is the ability of a product to properly function within specified performance limits, for a specified period of time, under the life cycle application conditions. By understanding reliability principles, the students have the fundamentals and skills in the field of reliability as it directly pertains to the design and the manufacture of electrical, mechanical, and electro mechanical products. The following topics will be covered:
1. Reliability concepts including failure distributions, reliability metrics, and redundancy as well as risk assessment, mitigation and management. 2.Techniques to design and manufacture electronic products with improved reliability, based on the study of Root-cause failure mechanisms. 3. Techniques to assess failures along with methods to conduct failure analysis. 4. Skills to develop a reliability program. 5. Methods to design and implement accelerated testing. 6. Methods to understand the reliability issues associated with warranties, safety, regulatory requirements, and the law.

MECH 535 Nano-to-Macro Transport Processes ( 3)
Parallel treatments of photons, electrons, phonons, and molecules as energy carriers, aiming at fundamental understanding and descriptive tools for energy and heat transport processes from nanoscale continuously to macroscale. Topics include the energy levels, the statistical behavior and internal energy, energy transport in the forms of waves and particles, scattering and heat generation processes, Boltzmann equation and derivation of classical laws, deviation from classical laws at nanoscale and their appropriate descriptions, with applications in nano- and microtechnology

MECH 541 Photovoltaic cells and Solar thermal systems (3)
This course focuses on science and technology of solar energy harvesting. One important module of this course teaches about the solar radiation and how to get maximum solar radiation at a given point. Next this course will delve into science and technology of solar thermal water and air heating systems. This course place special emphasis on photovoltaics cells (PV). This course will teach science and technology of PV cells. Various complimentary systems required to channel energy from PV cells to electrical appliances will be discussed. This course will also introduce key technological developments that are useful in making solar energy harvesting economical. This course will benefit from UDC experimental resources such as Zero energy home, solar thermal water heater trainer, vacuum tube solar thermal water heater, current-voltage meter to study the solar cell efficiency etc.

MECH 542 Fuel Cell Science and Technology (3)
This course show how Fuel cells can power hydrogen car, make a home self-reliant in energy, and power big stores and hotels with very high efficiency. This course provides in depth understanding of fundamentals of different types of fuel cells e.g. Polymer exchange membrane fuel cells, Solid oxide fuel cells, etc. This course covers the thermodynamic principles behind voltage generation and definition of fuel cell efficiency. Science behind generating high current in fuel cell is covered under dedicated module. This course will utilize UDC state of the art experimental facilities, including Potentiostate, LabVolt fuel cell trainer, Fuel cell powered automobile, hydrogen charging station, to provide experiential learning.

MECH 543 Wind Turbine Science and Technology (3)
This course teaches the science and technology for converting wind energy into electricity. This course will start with an introduction of wind resources and knowledge about selecting site for the wind turbine installation. One module of this course focus on the Horizontal axis and vertical axis wind turbines. Bernoulli principle will be utilized to explain the science of blade rotation. Different components such as yaw control, pitch control, air foil design etc will be covered, This course will immensely benefit from two 900 W horizontal axis wind turbine, vertical axis wind turbine, configurable wind turbine with various blade types. Students will be having a strong experiential learning course.

MECH 545 Design of Energy System (3)
This course analyzes the entirety of energy systems with a focus on mechanisms by which energy is produced, transported and transformed. Energy system involved, solar thermal water heating, nuclear fuel based electricity generation, refrigeration systems, geothermal heating and cooling systems will be discussed. Students in this course will be asked to utilize heating cooling system and power plant at UDC campus. Student will also experimentally analyze solar thermal water heater systems and geothermal cooling and heating systems.

MECH 546 Nanoscale Materials and Devices (3)
This course teaches the fundamental difference between the properties of nanomaterials and conventional materials. Experiential activities use current technology to produce a number of materials, such as nanowires, using bottom-up and top-down approaches. One important component of this course teaches the ability to integrate nanomaterials into device forms. A number of characterization tools such as the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and atomic force microscope (AFM) are covered as tools for nanometer scale metrology. Students will be participating in a number of experimental modules to learn about elements of nanotechnology. They will learn to use the cleanroom and methods of photolithography, thin film deposition, and device fabrication.

MECH 547 Biomedical Imaging Systems and Signal Processing (3)
An graduate-level course provides and in-depth discussion on biomedical signals and images including imaging modalities such as X-ray, computerized axial tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Fundamentals of signal and image processing including data acquisition, filtering, 2D signals and systems, noise reduction methods and homomorphic filtering for image enhancement will be discussed. An overview of random signals and linear systems and power spectra will also be discussed, and further, students will work on detailed research projects.

MECH 548 Machine Learning for Medical Detection & Diagnoses (3)
This course covers an overview of the fundamental Big Data challenges. Complex data structures, data cleaning, data preprocessing, and semantic integration of heterogeneous, distributed biomedical databases will be examined. Existing machine learning, data mining, neural and other novel computing tools for biomedical data analysis will be explored. Data visualization and imaging analysis will be discussed. In addition, the nature of clinical data will be introduced and the architecture and design of healthcare information systems will be covered. Comparisons of the state of the art clustering and feature selections methods for microarray data classification will be furnished. Lastly, privacy and security issues will be discussed. For the course topics described above, case studies will aid in describing contemporary systems and current research.

MECH 611 Special Topics in Mech. Engineering (3)
Exploration of special topics in concurrent engineering, such as intelligent design and manufacturing. Detailed examination of feature-based design and roles of quantitative reasoning, flexible-based design and roles of quantitative reasoning, flexible fixture systems, knowledge-based process planning for mechanical and electronic components, control of manufacturing systems, tools for building expert systems, neural networks to solve manufacturing problems.

MECH 621 Special Topics in Biomed. Engineering (3)
The purpose of this course is to expose students to an array of topics related to BME via guest speaker lectures, case studies, and interactive small group discussions. Each semester’s series is scoped toward a different topic in BME, resulting in a cycle that covers: medical ethics, research conduct, written and oral technical communication, and other medical-related topics and issues. Knowledgeable faculty and professionals in the field are BME are invited to present interactive and informative workshops to expose the student to potential topics of interest.

MECH 631 Mechanical Fundamentals and Design of Electronic Systems ( 3)
An understanding of the fundamental mechanical principles used in design of electronic devices and their integration into electronic systems will be provided. Focus will be placed on the effect of materials compatibility, thermal stress, mechanical stress, and environmental exposure on product performance, durability and cost. Both electronic devices and package assemblies will be considered. analysis of package assemblies to understand thermal and mechanical stress effects will be emphasized through student projects.

MECH 671 Science and Technology of Fuel Cells and Batteries (3)
Fuel cells are fast growing energy device to produce electricity out of the water. Batteries are widely used for energy storage. The objective of this course is to educate graduate students about the underlying principles of fuel cells and batteries. Thermodynamic mechanism and electrochemistry will be used to define fuel cell and battery fundamentals. We will closely study the materials and design aspect of this system. Some common fuel cells and batteries will be discussed individually.

MECH 672 Nanomaterials for Next Generation Computers (3)
Increasing computational power and memory is the most pressing need for the current computers. Utilization of nanomaterials and nanostructures is vital to keep advancing computer technology. This course will discuss the science and technology of nanomaterials in the present computers. This course will also provide the profound understanding of the nanomaterials for the futuristic quantum computers.

MECH 673 Computational materials science (3)
Computers have revolutionized the process of innovation and new discoveries in the area of materials for every field. This course will discuss the science of computing materials properties. In this course, students will gain the fundamental understanding of Monte Carlo simulation, Finite element analysis, and quantum mechanical calculations.

MECH 674 Advanced science and technology of solar cells (3)
Solar cells are one of the most reliable and cleanest forms of energy harvesting technology. This course will discuss the science and technology of common types of solar cells. The student will learn about the energy band diagrams, solar absorption mechanism, etc. The student will learn about the mathematical models to describe the mechanism for solar cells.

MECH 679 Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering (3)
Covers a specific area related to mechanical engineering that is not normally covered in core Ph.D. classes.

MECH 699 Master’s Thesis (6-9)
A supervised research project for thesis option equivalent to two regular three-credit courses. Topics to be determined by student and supervisor.


Subject Codes:           APCT            BMEG            CCEN            CMOP            CSCI            CVEN            ELEC            MECH