Why pursue a career in Biomedical Engineering?

BME Handout Program Sheet

Biomedical Engineering (or BME) is projected to be the fastest growing occupation (> 72% increase nationwide) over the next several years.  This large growth means that the demand and number of available jobs for Biomedical Engineers are high.

What is Biomedical Engineering?

Biomedical engineering is a highly interdisciplinary field which involves the application of engineering principles and design concepts to solve medical-related problems that affect human quality of life.  There are limitless examples of Biomedical Engineering “at work”: the development orthopedic devices and drug delivery systems, the development of minimal invasive surgery techniques and devices, the advancement of noninvasive imaging technology, the design and implementation of non-invasive and invasive devices to aid in patient rehabilitation, and others.  Through the application of engineering principles and design concepts to solve problems in medicine and biology, Biomedical Engineering provides a convergence of life sciences with engineering.

Biomedical Engineering at UDC

Housed within the UDC Department of Mechanical Engineering, the Biomedical Engineering program was full-board approved in Fall 2014.  Further, a state-of-the-art Biomedical Engineering research and education laboratory (the Center for Biomechanical & Rehabilitation, CBRE) was opened in Fall 2015.

UDC is located in a “hotbed” for Biomedical Engineering research in that, world-renowned institutions (e.g., the National Rehabilitation Hospital (NRH), then National Institutes of Health (NIH), Walter Reed Medical Center, and the Food & Drug Administration (FDA)) are all within close proximity to UDC.  Further, UDC’s lower tuition fees, compared to other DC region universities offering degrees in BME, hold tremendous attraction to persons seeking a quality but economical education without sacrificing learning and research experiences.  Lastly, students benefit from small class size and a personal teaching environment, as well as individual attention from faculty.

Biomedical Engineering Program Activities

  • Biomedical Engineering Journal Club
  • Biomedical Engineering/STEM Guest Lecture Series
  • Summer Biomedical Engineering Workshop
  • Professional Development Series I & II

 

3-D Printed Prosthetic Hand developed by UDC Mechanical Engineering Students (left) and Open Bionics robotic hand (right)

Co-curricular activities, such as the BME Journal Club and BME Guest Lecture series, contribute to an enhanced research-education infrastructure for our students, as well as faculty. Aside from the development of new courses and activities in BME, there has been significant efforts put forth towards establishing new BME research at UDC. Specifically, a newly renovated Biomedical Engineering research laboratory, Center for Biomechanical & Rehabilitation Engineering (CBRE) was opened in Summer 2015.

US FDA Guest Speaker Event in UDC CBRE Lab

The state-of-the-art lab offers students the opportunity to gain meaningful research experience in parallel with their coursework.  The focus of the CBRE research lab is studying human postural control/mobility and assistive devices to aid individuals that are un-impaired (e.g., athletes and non-athletes) and balance-impaired (e.g., fall-prone elderly, stroke survivors, vestibular loss sufferers, and amputees).

UDC Mechanical Engineering student using Vicon Motion Capture system to capture her body kinematics


Mind-control: using a Mindwave EEG kit to play a computer game, solely with one’s thoughts

UDC is located in a “hotbed” for Biomedical Engineering research in that, world-renowned institutions (e.g., the National Rehabilitation Hospital (NRH), then National Institutes of Health (NIH), Walter Reed Medical Center, and the Food & Drug Administration (FDA)) are all within close proximity to UDC. Further, UDC’s lower tuition fees, compared to other DC region universities offering degrees in BME, hold tremendous attraction to persons seeking a quality but economical education without sacrificing learning and research experiences. Lastly, students benefit from small class size and a personal teaching environment, as well as individual attention from faculty.