Computer Science and Information Technology: The UDC Edge

Located in the heart of the nation’s capitol, the University of the District of Columbia is an affordable and high quality educational option, attentive to your needs and committed to your success. UDC features one of the largest computer science and information technology departments of any university in the D.C. area.

Our program emphasizes hands-on, research-oriented learning.

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science (BSCS)

The overall mission of the computing programs is to prepare nationally and internationally competitive graduates, at the graduate and baccalaureate levels, in computer science and information technologies to meet the needs of the current and future technology era. Computer Science is the development of computer software; Information Technology is the use of computers and software to manage information.

The Bachelor of Science in Computer Science (BSCS) enables students to enter the computing profession at a technical – scientific level or to proceed to graduate programs in Computer Science. It is a four-year program with a heavy emphasis on mathematics and the study of algorithmic processes to describe and transform information.

The program objectives and outcomes of our BSCS program are consistent with the mission of the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, which is: To provide nationally competitive and fully accredited professional programs at the certificate, associate, baccalaureate, and graduate levels. These programs enable immediate employment upon graduation or for continuation for advanced level studies in the respective disciplines.

Curriculum and Requirements in the UDC Computer Science Program

You must complete 122 credit hours of course work to earn the bachelor’s degree in computer science. Topics covered in the information technology curriculum include:

The Computer Science program prepares students to enter the computing profession at a technical – scientific level or to proceed to graduate programs in Computer Science. It is a four-year program with a heavy emphasis on mathematics and the study of algorithmic processes to describe and transform information.

Download the curriculum requirements for majors [PDF]

Download the complete undergraduate course listing [PDF]

The Bachelor of Science degree in Information Technology (BSIT) prepares students for careers in the broadly defined field of information technology. Core courses provide students with sufficient exposure to networking and system administration, web and multimedia content development, programming and application development, including database management systems and web applications, technology integration and deployment in a user community, including needs assessment, user-centered design, technology transfer, and ongoing support. After fulfilling the core course requirements, students can obtain greater depth in several IT areas including network administration, game development or web-database integration.

The program objectives and outcomes of our BSIT program are consistent with the mission of the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, which is: To provide nationally competitive and fully accredited professional programs at the certificate, associate, baccalaureate, and graduate levels. These programs enable immediate employment upon graduation or for continuation for advanced level studies in the respective disciplines.

Curriculum and Requirements in the UDC Information Technology Program

You must complete 123 credit hours of course work to earn the bachelor’s degree in information technology. Topics covered in the information technology curriculum include:

  • Networking and system administration
  • Web and multimedia content development
  • Computer programming and application development
    • Database management systems
    • Web applications
  • Technology integration and deployment in a user community
    • Including needs assessment, user-centered design, technology transfer, and ongoing support.

Download the curriculum requirements for information technology majors [PDF]
Download the complete undergraduate course listing [PDF]

Program Educational Objectives and Student Outcomes

The program educational objectives (PEO) of the undergraduate computer science program are broad statements that describe what our graduates are expected to attain.
Our graduates will have

  1. have become practiced and competitive professionals in computer science, or related application or applied areas; or have entered, if not completed, a graduate program.
  2. continuously improve their technical knowledge and abilities in computing, thus allowing them to adapt to changes in the profession.
  3. continuously maximize the impact of their technical knowledge in their community and in our society.
  4. be professionally ethical at all times.

*The computer science program (BSCS) is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc. (http://www.abet.org).

Computer Science Student Outcomes

  • An ability to apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the discipline
  • An ability to analyze a problem, and identify and define the computing requirements appropriate to its solution
  • An ability to design, implement, and evaluate a computer-based system, process, component, or program to meet desired needs
  • An ability to function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal
  • An understanding of professional, ethical, legal, security and social issues and responsibilities
  • An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences
  • An ability to analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, organizations, and society
  • Recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in continuing professional development
  • An ability to use current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing practice
  • An ability to apply mathematical foundations, algorithmic principles, and computer science theory in the modeling and design of computer-based systems in a way that demonstrates comprehension of the tradeoffs involved in design choices
  • An ability to apply design and development principles in the construction of software systems of varying complexity

Information Technology – Student Outcomes

  • An ability to apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the discipline
  • An ability to analyze a problem, and identify and define the computing requirements appropriate to its solution
  • An ability to design, implement, and evaluate a computer-based system, process, component, or program to meet desired needs
  • An ability to function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal
  • An understanding of professional, ethical, legal, security and social issues and responsibilities
  • An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences
  • An ability to analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, organizations, and society
  • Recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in continuing professional development
  • An ability to use current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing practice
  • An ability to use and apply current technical concepts and practices in the core information technologies
  • An ability to identify and analyze user needs and take them into account in the selection, creation, evaluation and administration of computer-based systems
  • An ability to effectively integrate IT-based solutions into the user environment
  • An understanding of best practices and standards and their application
  • An ability to assist in the creation of an effective project plan

Related:

Master of Science in Computer Science

The Master of Science in Computer Science (MSCS) program is tailored to meet the needs of traditional students as well as working professionals in the greater Washington, DC area. The program emphasizes a practitioner-oriented curriculum that includes advanced algorithms, network security, artificial intelligence, computer graphics, image processing, software systems, and database. The program offers a thesis option and a non-thesis option.

Download curriculum advising sheet [PDF]

Curriculum requirements for the master of science in computer science

Student Organizations and Activities in the UDC Information Technology Program

The School of Engineering and Applied Sciences hosts a week of special events to inspire current and future engineers. Each February our National Engineers Week includes lab visits, project presentations, networking opportunities and other events sponsored by student groups and affiliated organizations.
Student groups for Computer Science and Information Technology students include:

Faculty Spotlight: UDC Computer Science and Information Technology Programs

Dr. Briana Wellman, Assistant Professor – Acting Department Chair, briana.wellman@udc.edu
Ms. Uzma Amir, Visiting Assistant Professor, uzma.amir@udc.edu
Dr. Li Chen, Associate Professor, lchen@udc.edu
Dr. Shakir James, Visiting Assistant Professor, shakir.james@udc.edu
Dr. Dong Jeong, Associate Professor, djeong@udc.edu
Dr. Thabet Kacem, Assistant Professor, thabet.kacem@udc.edu
Dr. Junwhan Kim, Assistant Professor, junwan.kim@udc.edu
Dr. Lily Liang, Professor, lliang@udc.edu
Dr. Byunggu Yu, Professor, byu@udc.edu

Career Pathways and Prospects

Information technology professionals are in high demand, and a degree from UDC will prepare you for career opportunities in both the private and public sector as a system administrator, network administrator or information technology specialist.

You can find UDC School of Engineering and Applied Sciences alumni working at Google, the D.C. Metropolitan Transit Authority, the U.S. Patent Office, NASA, Xerox, Motorola, Northwest Airlines, Cisco, AT&T and the National Institutes of Health, to name a few.

You may also choose to pursue graduate studies right here at UDC or at institutions such as Howard University, George Washington University and the University of Maryland.

Contact info:

E: lmanning@udc.edu | T: 202.274.6278