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Publication of the University of the District of Columbia's Journalism Program. MARCH 2015

 

Student Center on track for Fall 2015 opening

BY ANDRES ALMEIDA

new_sportsCONSTRUCTION ON THE NEW STUDENT CENTER CONTINUES
PHOTO: COURTESY UDC.EDU

The new Student Center at the University of the District of Columbia is still on track for a late-year ribbon-cutting, says VP of Student Services Dr. Valerie Epps. .

At 96,000 square feet, the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)-certified building will include a 14,000 square-foot green roof that will make the center’s energy consumption more efficient. Most students are looking forward to the center’s amenities, which include a fitness center and upgraded dining area.

The new facility is not restricted to UDC students, staff, and faculty, however. In a town hall meeting held at UDC last fall, Valerie Epps said the building would be open to the surrounding community. To support this, the Student Center will hold several “community support” rooms where area residents can convene for meetings, research, or events.

As of February 2015, the building’s exterior framing is being set and the steel has been set for the clock tower.

The transition awaits to be made

BY Mirchaye Sahlu

council_hearing

RASHED MOHAMED,UDC ENGINEERING STUDENT
PHOTO: MIRCHAYE SAHLU

As the last semester of their school year starts, graduating seniors are preparing themselves as they make their transition from college life to the real world. The University of the District of Columbia welcomes students from all over the world and they each come with their own culture, dreams and aspirations. However, they each possess the same goal, which is to graduate and land a good job. We spoke with some local and international students and asked how they are preparing to make their transitions to the real world and how they are going to put their degrees to use to fulfill their dreams.

Katya Krupko Major: Architecture Hometown: Kaliningrad, Russia Hailing from the historic Russian city of Kaliningrad, Krupko grew up viewing gorgeous landscapes, which later on progressed her to sketching in open air. She enrolled at Moscow State University of Technology and Management to pursue higher education in architecture. She then decided to travel to the United States to explore the world further. Krupko joined UDC in August of 2012, where she is now pursuing a Bachelors of Science in architecture. Her dream is to become a licensed architect and lead a successful career in the US and Europe. Krupko is currently working with Founding Farmers Group and VSAG. She has been keeping herself occupied with various arts projects. A graduating senior herself, Krupko advises upcoming graduates to work hard, be responsible for their actions and learn to be empathetic listeners. She adds: “I believe that these are very important traits in becoming a successful professional.”

Courtney Lawton Major: English Hometown: Hattiesburg, Mississippi Born and raised in a small town, Lawton is a woman with big dreams. As she is getting ready to graduate with a Bachelors of Arts in English from UDC in the spring, Lawton is already mapping out her future plans. She has come a long way, leaving her family to come to Washington, D.C., where she knew no one, to make a better life for herself. She first enrolled at CCDC, where she got her Associates in Legal Administration. An aspiring lawyer, Lawton says: “After graduation, I hope to go to law school and focus on intellectual property.” Additionally, Lawton shares her exciting hobby, “I’m currently working on and off a romantic horror story that I’ve got faith in.” She adds; “It would be a dream for my story to evolve into a film, that way everyone can see the things that i saw when i was writing it.”

A. Peter Bailey: What is the future of the black press?

BY Ndeye Aminata Ndiaye

council_hearing

PROFERSSOR BAILEY TEACHING

PHOTO : AMINA NDIAYE

In 1964, in a verge of creating his first black newspaper, the late Malcolm X, recruited a young, ambitious man whom knowledge about journalism was non-existent. Fifty years later, A. Peter Bailey has become a renowned journalist, whose work with his late mentor is still his guideline today. An expert of the late civil right movement pioneer, Bailey was interviewee on a documentary about the assassination of Malcolm X at the CNN network. Along the way, he has worked as a reporter for prestigious magazines like Jet, Essence, Ebony, and he worked as a columnist for the New York Times, New York Daily News, Richmond Free Press. He is currently a monthly columnist at the Trice-Edney wire Reality Check. He declared: “ When brother Malcolm, invited me to join his group, I was not a trained journalist, but he had a faith in my abilities and I had the chance to learn a lot with him”. Bailey is not just a distinguished journalist, but also an author, publishes books including his latest memoir of his years with the late Malcolm X titled Witnessing Brother Malcolm X: the Master Teacher.

Bailey has spent most of his career working in the black press. He believes that having a black press is very important, but it does not do as much as it should. According to him, the black press does not focus enough on economics and international issues; because of the lack of resources the black press should have a black correspondent on Wall Street and at the United Nations for example.

During a time of need Bailey applauses the job done by the black press in the case of Ferguson, Missouri. He declares: “I was really happy by the way the black press had cover the situation. It was done in a very professional matter.” Bailey still believes that black community “need to have more unity to fight actions” and that a movement is needed whose purpose is to promote and defend the interest of black people. Regarding the future of the black press, Bailey states, “I think some of the black newspapers are going to go under because of the technological changes. And I believe, I certainly hope that a certain number of those newspaper will survive; because I think that it is still very important.” He also thinks that the black press still has four major functions: to be a watch dog for the black community, to answer attacks against the black community, to present a different viewpoint, and to be able to preserve black culture

The transition awaits to be madeinter_national

BY MIRCHAYE SAHLU

We spoke with some local and international students to ask how they are preparing to make their transitions to the real world and how they are going to put their degrees to use to fulfill their dreams.

Student Center on track for Fall 2015 openingholiday_families

BY ANDRES ALMEIDA

At 96,000 square feet, the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)-certified building will include a 14,000 square-foot green roof that will make the center’s energy consumption more efficient.

NAAPB: UDC Law alliance to fight Police Brutalityisit_me

BY CHARIS HUMPHREY

The National Association Against Police Brutality (NAAPB) is designed to educate and empower citizens, in addition to making law enforcement accountable for its actions.

holiday_giftsKeep the flame burning

BY GAYBRIELLE HOLBERT

These are some of the secrets we have gathered from couples still have their flames lit fiercely in the name of love.