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Course Descriptions - Architecture and Community Planning (ARCP/ARAC)

The Academic Programs within CAUSES offer courses that are designed to prepare students not only for success in their chosen field of study but for long term success in their careers and lives. Our programs therefore aspire to prepare students to be global citizens committed to local relevance; to be adept at solving urban problems; to be aware of and dedicated to water and food security; to be skilled at navigating diverse social, cultural, built and natural environments; to be Independent thinkers and collaborative team players; and to be adaptive lifelong learners.

See below for full descriptions of each academic course offered by CAUSES. Course numbers and titles are followed by the number of credits, indicated in parenthesis. Prerequisite and co-requisite courses are named in the description, if applicable.

ARCP-101: Basic Design and Communication (3)
Are you interested in learning how designers communicate their ideas through sketches and formal drawings? Do you wonder about how drawings relay the message of what you are visualizing in your mind? Do you wonder how famous architects related their theories about the built environment? This course will introduce you to all of this and more. You will learn sketching techniques; formal drawing and drafting techniques; and how to communicate your ideas through architectural working drawings. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours.
ARCP-102: Basic Design and Communication II (3)
Prerequisite: ARCP-101. Were you intrigued by the ideas and concepts learned in ARCP-101? Then you are ready for this course. You will continue to develop skill in graphic communication and drafting. You will get a further understanding of the role of detailing in representing solutions to construction problems related to light construction. A scale model will be constructed as part of this course. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours.
ARCP-105: Introduction to Computer Technology (3)
Are you wondering how the computer is used in design and the exploration of ideas? What does CADD mean? If you are curious about these questions and have many more about AutoCAD and SketchUp in this class you will learn how to use these and other types of drawing and rendering tools that help you visualize and present your ideas. In the process you will learn how building components come together into a building envelope. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours.
ARCP-106: Introduction to Computer Technology II (3)
Prerequisite: ARCP-105. This course is a continuation of ARCP 105 continuing the exploration by learning to use Revit as a tool for building information modeling (BIM). The student will learn to develop 3D model representations of how building components interface with each other as weather proofing and environmental conditions concepts are used to manage the building envelope. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours.
ARCP-114: Materials & Methods of Construction (3)
Do you wonder how so many different materials come together to form a building? Are you curious about how it is that a tree becomes the wood used for building a house? Would you like to understand how various materials are stacked, glued, screwed and nailed together to make the interior of a building dry and warm when the outdoors is wet and cold? If you are wondering about any of these things this class is designed to help you solve the mystery. You will learn how wood, masonry, cement and more come together in a building. You will also learn many of the words, phrases, and names used to describe the building and building process. Lecture 2 Hours; Lab 3 Hours.
ARCP-116: Materials & Methods of Construction II (3)
Prerequisite: ARCP-114. Did you learn about the materials and the varied uses of them in a building? Are you intrigued by how cement turns to concrete? Are you curious about the process by which bricks or concrete blocks are made? Are you curious about how green architecture and sustainable construction affects the environment and the building's life span? These and many other concepts will be explored in this course. Field trips to various sites will be undertaken to get a first hand understanding of how materials are used in construction. At the end of this class you will be conversant in the language used in the building industry to describe process, methods and material use. Lecture 2 Hours; Lab 3 Hours.
ARCP-201: Architectural Studio I (3)
This is a continuation of ARCP-102 Basic Design and Communication II. The student will learn the graphic skills needed to organize and develop a set of 'working' drawings and the communication skills to present it. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours.
ARCP-202: Architectural Studio II (4)
Prerequisite: ARCP-201. By the end of the semester the student will learn how to develop 'working' drawings. As a part of this development the student will learn how the zoning and building codes inform the production of a building. The end product is a set of construction document drawings that accounts for code, structure and construction rules and good practice. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours.
ARCP-206: CAD Documentation, Specifications, and Estimating (3)
Prerequisite: ARCP-106. This course develops the student's skill in construction document coordination; detailing; discipline's coordination; specification writing and cost estimating. Students are expected to have detailed knowledge of AutoCAD and Revit and how they form the basis for preparing construction documents and building information management (BIM) systems.
ARCP-231: Statics and Structural Design (3)
This course studies the concepts of stresses and strength of materials; moment, shear, equilibrium, inertia, static loading versus dynamic loading, and torque. This course allows the student to develop the necessary skills to understand the primary elements of load calculation, load transfer, and load tables.
ARCP-241: Advanced Computer Simulation (3)
This course will explore the CADD program as a presentation tool. The integration of the 3D software output with software for enhancing the visual presentation objects will be learned. The student will be expected to understand and develop skills in the following areas: Solid Modeling, Animation, and Orthographic drawing presentation.
ARCP-244: Environmental Systems I (3)
In this course you will learn how plumbing systems are designed to manage waste disposal from the building; how power is supplied and controlled in a building envelope; and how illumination elements are designed to minimize environmental effects.
ARCP-246: Environmental Systems II (3)
Prerequisite: ARCP-244. This course will focus on Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation and Conservation of Energy. The student will learn methods of load calculations done manually, using tables to calculate heat transfer coefficients for any type of construction, determine temperature differences required by codes or by good practice, compute the size of equipment, piping and ducts which will be appropriate to the building type and use and available fuels. Simple residences or small commercial buildings will be analyzed for HVAC systems and plans will be prepared to guide the contractor for installation. Specifications for the work will be studied and written. Costs of fuels will be compared to optimize selection. Energy recovery and conservation will be practiced in the system designs.
ARCP-256: Built Environment (3)
This course provides a holistic introductory treatment of architecture and the built environment for architecture and non-architecture majors. The emphasis is on the examination of world-wide cultural belief systems and other factors that have had a major impact on the man-built world. The organized design professions are reviewed and their value systems examined. The course also exposes the student to the issues of sustainability and climate change, and the role those factors are playing.
ARCP-301: Architectural Studio III (5)
Prerequisite: ARCP-202. This course builds on the first two years of technical design studios. Are you interested in a more in-depth analysis process for arriving at a solution for a building design? How does the designer decide on which is the best plan layout and three dimensional shape of a building? This course will offer challenging design problems crafted to expose the student to the design analysis process used to study design situation in the urban context. The application of zoning and building codes to the building outcome is expected. You are expected to bring the skills developed in the preceding studios as you conceptualize solutions to architectural problems.
ARCP-302: Architectural Studio IV (5)
Prerequisite: ARCP-301. The analysis process will be applied in the development of a design concept. The students are expected to learn how to integrate the various disciplines that affect the shape, form and structure of the building. Life safety issues and the architectural responses will be learned and applied to given design problems. Students are expected to understand how the structural systems are applied in the context of the given building type.
ARCP-321: History & Theory of Architecture (3)
Have you ever wondered why the National Cathedral or the Basilica at Catholic University looks the way it does? Have you wondered who paid to have the pyramids built? Why did it take so many people to build the pyramids? Why was it important to have a pharaoh? These and many other questions about the influences of people their actions and choices on the built environment will be discussed in this course. The development of shelter, architectural space and sacred places from prehistoric times to the Gothic Cathedrals will be explored. The influences of economics, politics, culture, technology and philosophy shaping the built environment throughout thousands of years of human civilization will be explored.
ARCP-322: History & Theory of Architecture II (3)
Prerequisite: ARCP-321. This course will study the built environment; the design of buildings and spaces from the Gothic Period through modern times. The development of the major schools of architectural thought will be explored. The shaping of the built environment by technology will be explored. The student will learn how the major design philosophies and schools of thought influenced our modern day treatment of the built environment.
ARCP-331: Theory of Structures (3)
Prerequisite: ARCP-231. Analysis of statically determinate beams and trusses, methods of determining deflection of structures, influence lines and application for moving loads and indeterminate structures including continuous beams and frames are pursued. The course presents the classical methods of structural analysis needed to analyze statically determinate and indeterminate structures. It aims at providing the necessary analysis foundation for the design courses that typically follow this course in the traditional architectural engineering curriculum.
ARCP-332: Design of Steel Structures (3)
Prerequisite: ARCP-331. This course reviews the concepts of stresses and strength of materials: moment, shear, equilibrium, inertia, static loading versus dynamic loading, and torque. This course allows the student to develop the necessary skills to understand the primary elements of load calculation, load transfer, and load tables as it relates to steel construction and specifically steel frame construction. The AISC codes are employed in computations.
ARCP-401: Architectural Studio V (5)
Prerequisite: ARCP-302. This studio is a continuation of Laboratory IV with the emphasis shifting to the cost and time management control aspects of building design and production. The student will undertake two architectural designs of mid-size building types on primarily urban sites located in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. The architectural design problems will be set to assure that the student reaches a basic level of competence in addressing the problems associated with architecture within an urban context. The two projects will vary in time and scope. The problem(s) set in this studio challenge the student to search for, coordinate, and consolidate the basic systems (structural, environmental, mechanical, etc) with special emphasis on development of their own design process and philosophy.
ARCP-402: Architectural Studio VI (5)
Prerequisite: ARCP-401. This course is the culmination of architectural design studio course sequence in the Bachelor of Science in Architecture Degree program. The student is expected to demonstrate a firm grasp of the skills required for undertaking comprehensive, sustainable and inclusive building design. The communication and illustration of the design solution is of paramount importance in demonstrating the acquisition of design skills. The semester is devoted to the undertaking of an urban-scale design project with minimum faculty supervision.
ARCP-411: Professional Ethics & Practice (3)
This course undertakes a general review of the profession of Architecture; historic developments; relation to other professions and disciplines; the changing role of the Architect; architectural and related professional societies; state and national registration boards; education accreditation; federal, state and municipal agencies and legal and ethical questions relating to the practice of architecture and emerging forms of practice.
ARCP-412: Preservation Rehabilitation Technology I (3)
The course utilizes the Secretary of the Interior's Certification application, preservation guidelines and technical specifications as the base of case study analysis of the planning and design of historic structures in Washington, D. C. Non­historic rehabilitation techniques in housing, cost control and recycle/retrofit techniques for various structures are also analyzed
ARCP-414: Professional Ethics & Practice II (3)
Prerequisite: ARCP-411. This course focuses, via the case study method, on the business and financial tools of professional practice including real estate development and other emerging entrepreneur opportunities. The student is expected to understand the ethics associated with the practice of Architecture as a business and profession that is responsible for health safety and welfare of the public.
ARCP-432: Design of Concrete Structures (3)
Prerequisite: ARCP-331. The Design of Concrete Structures covers the analysis and design of reinforced concrete rectangular and T-beams, one-way slabs, short and slender (long) columns, spread footings, and wall footings. The concepts of stresses and strength of materials: moments, shear, equilibrium, inertia, static loading versus dynamic loading and torque are reviewed. This course allows the student to develop the necessary skills to understand the primary elements of load calculation, load transfer, and load tables as it relates to concrete and concrete frames. The ACI codes are employed in computations.
ARCP-501: Professional Studio Lab VII (5)
This course is the first part of an integrated two semester studio sequence in the Master of Architecture degree program. The course seeks to prepare the student for the full-fledged status of intern architect preparing for licensure. The student undertakes the comprehensive design of a substantive urban mixed use building project in this semester with special attention to sustainability, energy efficiency and development finance economics. Basic competency in Revit and SketchUp is strongly recommended.
ARCP-502: Thesis Studio Lab VIII (5)
This course is the second part of an integrated two semester studio sequence in the Master of Architecture degree program. Basic competency in Revit and SketchUp is required. The course continues the path of preparation for the full-fledged status of intern architect preparing for licensure with special attention to sustainability, energy efficiency and development finance economics. The student undertakes the comprehensive design of a substantive urban mixed use building project in this semester. The semester is devoted to the completion of a design statement envisioned in the pre-design document prepared in ARCP 507 Graduate Seminar during the fall semester preceding.
ARCP-503: Urban and Community Design I (3)
Do you ever wonder why cities look like they do? Or perhaps who is responsible for making the decisions that result in the shape and character of a city? Or perhaps you would like to know how you as an individual can influence your surroundings? This class is intended to promote understanding of public space and public life through readings and discussions in urban design and planning through observation and analysis of urban conditions in Washington, D.C. Students will learn the practical tools of urban design as well as graphic communication techniques. Student will expand and refine their skills using spatial analysis via drawing and diagramming urban conditions.
ARCP-504: Urban and Community Design II (3)
Prerequisite: ARCP-503. Do you continue to wonder why cities look like they do? Or perhaps who is responsible for making the decisions that result in the shape and character of a city? Perhaps you would like to understand how you as an individual can influence your surroundings? This class is intended to delve deeper into understanding how public space and public life come about through readings and discussions in urban design and planning through observation and analysis of urban conditions in Washington, D.C. Field trips to local sites will be included in the in depth study of the urban landscape. Students are expected to have a grasp of the practical tools of urban design illustration as well as graphic communication techniques. Student will be expected to be able to communicate their ideas using spatial analysis via drawing and diagramming urban conditions.
ARCP-505: Sustainable Design I (3)
Buildings account for approximately 50-60% of the energy usage in the United States. As building designers, architects are particularly accountable for increasing the energy efficiency of all structures to achieve a more sustainable balance in our built environment. But how do we accomplish that? What can be done to make buildings more energy efficient? This course will introduce students to the USGBC LEED rating system, as well as other programs, which facilitates the design, review, and maintenance of new and existing buildings through the incorporation of "green" technologies. Students will examine the benefits of designing sustainable buildings and understand the process involved in achieving LEED certification.
ARCP-506: Sustainable Design II (3)
Prerequisite: ARCP-505. How does the design process change when designing energy efficient buildings? Does applying LEED credits to a building change the shape of the final design? Using the LEED program, students will design an energy efficient building. Sustainable design technologies will be reviewed and applied to an actual building via a design studio program. Lectures will examine other aspects of sustainability that do not include building design and discuss how students can apply sustainable practices to their own lives.
ARCP-507: Graduate Seminar (3)
Successful completion of this course is the prerequisite for enrollment in the spring semester ARCP 502 Thesis Studio. Graduate school level scholarly writing proficiency and research skills are required. Extensive critical reading and written reviews occur. The student selects a master's thesis topic in consultation with the course instructor; develops the research protocol; documentation; pre-design program and problem statement. The approved document is the basis for ARCP 502 Thesis Studio Thesis Design Project.
ARCP-601: Preservation Rehabilitation Technology (3)
This is a unified two semester treatment that in the first semester uses the Secretary of the Interior's certification application guidelines and technical specifications as the basis of case study analysis of the planning and design of historic structures in Washington, DC as a point of departure. The second semester is available in the Master's program. The second semester emphasis is on the adaptable reuse of historic and non-historic structures.
The following courses are designed for students who have a non-architecture degree and wish to pursue architecture at the graduate level. The courses are designed to provide such a student with a structured way to achieve success in a profession that has intense technical components; a unique graphic language for communicating ideas; and an analytical method for making decisions and solving problems.
 
ARAC-501: Design Studio I (3)
This course is for graduate students who need to catch up on fundamental skills covered in ARCP-102 and ARCP-102. This course covers principles and theory of drawing types and techniques of three dimensional modeling. The SketchUp software program will be used in developing three dimensional visualization skills. Because a building will be produced the student will also learn about building components and how they come together to construct a building. Since design involves the bringing together of a group of activities into one envelope, the student will learn the fundamentals of design analysis. How to present your work in the architectural graphic language will also be studied. Mastering the vocabulary related to light frame construction is expected. Scale models will be constructed. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours.
ARAC-502: Design Studio II (3)
Prerequisite: ARAC-501. This course is for graduate students who need to catch up on fundamental skills covered in ARCP-201 and ARCP-202. By the end of the semester the student will learn how to develop 'working' drawings. As a part of this development the student will learn how the zoning and building codes inform the production of a building. The end product is a set of construction document drawings that accounts for code, structure and construction rules and good practice. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours.
ARAC-503: Design Studio III (3)
This is a continuation of ARAC-502. This course is for graduate students who need to catch up on fundamental skills covered in ARCP-301 and ARCP-302. This course will offer challenging design problems crafted to expose the student to the design analysis process used to study design situation in the urban context. The application of zoning and building codes to the building outcome is expected. You are expected to bring the skills developed in the preceding studios as you conceptualize solutions to architectural problems. The students are expected to learn how to integrate the various disciplines that affect the shape, form and structure of the building. Life safety issues and the architectural responses will be learned and applied to given design problems. Students are expected to understand how the structural systems are applied in the context of the given building type. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours.
ARAC-504: Design Studio IV (5)
This is a continuation of ARAC-503. This course is for graduate students who need to catch up on fundamental skills covered in ARCP-401 and ARCP-402. The student is expected to demonstrate firm grasp of the skills required undertaking comprehensive, sustainable and inclusive building design. The communication and illustration of the design solution is of paramount importance in demonstrating the acquisition of design skills. The semester is devoted to the undertaking of an urban-scale design project with minimum faculty supervision. Lecture and Consultation 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours.
ARAC-511: Building Information Modeling I (3)
This course is for graduate students who need to catch up on fundamental skills covered in ARCP-105. Are you wondering how the computer is used in design and the exploration of idea? What does CADD mean? If you are curious about these questions and have many more about AutoCAD and SketchUp in this class you will learn how to use these and other types of drawing and rendering tools that help you visualize and present your ideas. In the process you will learn how building components come together into a building envelope. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours.
ARAC-512: Building Information Modeling II (3)
Prerequisite: ARAC-511. This course is for graduate students who need to catch up on fundamental skills covered in ARCP-105 and ARCP-106. This course continues the exploration of CADD by learning to use Revit as a tool for building information modeling (BIM). The student will learn to develop 3D model representations of how building components interface with each other as weather proofing and environmental conditions concept are used to manage the building envelope. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours.
ARAC-513: Statics & Structural Design (3)
This course is for graduate students who need to catch up on fundamental skills covered in ARCP-231. The course provides the student with skills necessary to understand the primary elements of structural systems load calculations, load transfer, and load tables. The student shall become familiar with light frame, heavy timber, light steel, and concrete systems and calculating wood, steel and concrete beams and columns and concrete slabs.
ARAC-514: Theory of Structures (3)
This course is for graduate students who need to catch up on fundamental skills covered in ARCP-331. Analysis of statically determinate beams and trusses, methods of determining deflection of structures, influence lines and application for moving loads and indeterminate structures including continuous beams and frames are pursued. The course presents the classical methods of structural analysis needed to analyze statically determinate and indeterminate structures. It aims at providing the necessary analysis foundation for the design courses that typically follow this course in the traditional architectural engineering curriculum.
ARAC-515: Building Information Modeling III (3)
This course is for graduate students who need to catch up on fundamental skills covered in ARCP 241. This course will explore the CADD program as a presentation tool. The integration of the 3D software output with software for enhancing the visual presentation objects will be learned. The student will be expected to understand and develop skills in the following areas: Solid Modeling, Animation, and Orthographic drawing presentation.
ARAC-516: Environmental Studies (3)
This course is for graduate students who need to catch up on fundamental skills covered in ARCP-246. This course focuses on Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation and Conservation of Energy. The student will learn methods of load calculations done manually, using tables to calculate heat transfer coefficients for any type of construction, determine temperature differences required by codes or by good practice, compute the size of equipment, piping and ducts which will be appropriate to the building type and use and available fuels. Simple residences or small commercial buildings will be analyzed for HVAC systems and plans will be prepared to guide the contractor for installation. Specifications for the work will be studied and written. Costs of fuels will be compared to optimize selection. Energy recovery and conservation will be practiced in the system designs.
ARAC-518: Contract Administration (3)
This course is for graduate students who need to catch up on fundamental skills covered in ARCP-414. This course focuses, via the case study method, on the business and financial tools of professional practice including real estate development and other emerging entrepreneur opportunities. The student is expected to understand the ethics associated with the practice of Architecture as a business and profession who is responsible for health safety and welfare of the public.
ARAC-519: Design of Concrete Structures (3)
Prerequisite: ARAC-513. This course is for graduate students who need to catch up on fundamental skills covered in ARCP-432. The Design of Concrete Structures covers the analysis and design of reinforced concrete rectangular and T-beams, one-way slabs, short and slender (long) columns, spread footings, and wall footings. The concepts of stresses and strength of materials: moments, shear, equilibrium, inertia, static loading versus dynamic loading and torque are reviewed. This course allows the student to develop the necessary skills to understand the primary elements of load calculation, load transfer, and load tables as it relates to concrete and concrete frames. The ACI codes are employed in computations.
ARAC-520: Design of Steel Structures (3)
This course is for graduate students who need to catch up on fundamental skills covered in ARCP-332. Prerequisite: ARAC-514. This course reviews the concepts of stresses and strength of materials: moment, shear, equilibrium, inertia, static loading versus dynamic loading, and torque. This course allows the student to develop the necessary skills to understand the primary elements of load calculation, load transfer, and load tables as it relates to steel construction and specifically steel frame construction. The AISC codes are employed in computations.
ARAC-522: History & Theory of Architecture (3)
This course is for graduate students who need to catch up on fundamental skills covered in ARCP-322. The student is expected to independently review the material covered in ARCP-321. This course will study the built environment; the design of buildings and spaces from the Gothic Period through modern times. The development of the major schools of architectural thought will be explored. The shaping of the built environment by technology will be explored. The student will learn how the major design philosophies and schools of thought influenced our modern day treatment of the built environment.

 

 

College of Urban Agriculture and Environmental Studies (CAUSES)

CAUSES Academic Programs

Environmental Science and Urban Sustainability – Tom Kakovitch, Chair
Health Education - John Slack, Chair
Nursing – Dr. Pier Broadnax, Chair
Nutrition and Dietetics - Dr. Prema Ganganna, Chair
Urban Architecture and Community Planning - Ralph Belton, Chair


CAUSES Land-grant Programs

Architectural Research Institute - Clarence Pearson, Director
Center for 4-H and Youth Development – Rebecca Bankhead, Director
Center for Sustainable Development – Dr. Dwane Jones, Director
Institute of Gerontology - Dr. Elgloria Harrison, Interim Director
Water Resources Research Institute – Dr. Tolessa Deksissa, Director
Center for Urban Agriculture & Gardening Education – Che’ Axum, Director
Center for Nutrition, Diet and Health - Dr. Lillie Monroe-Lord


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