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Office of Academic Affairs

Office of the Provost
Vice-President for Academic Affairs

Building 39, Room 301-D   |   phone 202.274.5072   |   phone TheProvost@udc.edu

 

Early Faculty Careers at UDC

Presentation made by Dean Rachel Petty, Prof. Deepak Kumar, and Prof. Sylvia Hill

Objectives: To provide information that will allow early career faculty members to

  • Understand career management process [at UDC]
  • Improve performance
  • Assess resources and tools for career advancement
  • Advance their careers
  • Create individualized development plan

[BECOME THE INDISPENSIBLE UNIVERSITY CITIZEN]

 

1. TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR CAREER:

5 points to consider

  1. A clear understanding of your own strengths, motivators
    and competencies.
     
  2. You have to be visible.
     
  3. Link your development and contribution to the University Mission [business strategy]/Find yourself mentor (s).
     
  4. Ensure your Chairperson’s/Dean’s participation.
     
  5. Most importantly - hold yourself accountable for your own development.
 
Self Assessment
Strengths and Motivation
Interests and Passions
Skills and Development Areas
Mission and Vision
Opportunities
Research/Scholarly Activities
Education
Service
[Classrooms; Labs; Program Building; Community outreach;
Capital Ventures; Entrepreneurship etc.]
 
Execution Phase
Skill Building/learn
Gain Experience
NETWORKING
VISIBILITY
DOCUMENTATION
Identify and set goals
Commitment
Action Plan
Timeline
Modified from Tiedmann & O’hara and Lisa Heiser, JHU
 

THE 3-PRONGED APPROACH FOR A SUCCESSFUL UDC FACULTY MEMBER

 

FIND YOURSELF A MENTOR

Some Benefits of Mentorship:

  • Strategic Planning
     
  • Greater Productivity
     
  • Goal Achievement
     
  • Understanding UDC
     
  • Administrative Support
     
  • Identify resources
     
  • Managerial Skills
     
  • Stimulation
     
  • Reflection & Review
 

What to look for in a mentor

  • Experience – Not necessarily in your own field but a well rounded experience; cross disciplinary activities.
     
  • Enthusiastic – Positive outlook toward her/his chosen profession
     
  • Supportive and trustworthy – of your career; scholarly activities
     
  • Available/Accessibility – willing to give his/her time
 

TEACHING
An integral part of your career

Why are we teaching?

  • To contribute to the development of our discipline as a research development project and as a field of employability
     
  • To contribute to outcome assessments that are indicators that a University is worth the city government investing in such as : graduation rates and graduation rates within a time frame, graduates who attend graduate school, graduates who are employable, graduates who contribute to research, graduates who contribute to the larger political, cultural , and civic life of this society and internationally.
 

Other reasons for teaching

  • To be socially responsible to future generations so that they have an opportunity to transform their economic status
     
  • To counter the race, ethnic group, class, and gender patterns of discrimination of educational systems
     
  • To empower students to find their personal missions in life
 

USING A COMMITMENT TO TEACHING AS A PATHWAY FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

  • Examples of research using a teaching focus for research purposes
     
  • Second Life research and other online research efforts
     
  • Research on the impact of instructional methodologies on learning
     
  • The use of math software as a teaching methodology and its impact on student success rate in remedial math
 

RESEARCH ???

  1. What are you interested in? [your interest and interest to research community]
  2. How many people are working on that?
  3. Initially, choose a topic with some publications?
  4. What are your strengths? [in general and in that area]
  5. What is the significance? [to the agency and general]
  6. How will it enhance your portfolio in terms of Publications and Grants?
  7. How will it help you keep visible and competitive?
  8. Flexible?
  9. Broader implications?
  10. Think across disciplines
  11. Sellable? [who will fund it]
  12. Make a plan/ timeline with concrete goals
  13. Attend workshops on grant writing organized by UDC-OSRP and other agencies
    such as www.cur.org, etc...
  14. INVOLVE STUDENTS IN RESEARCH
 

HELP IS AVAILABLE

UDC OSRP conducts regular workshops on funding opportunities and grant writing
Provides assistance in identification of funding opportunity, proposal writing and
management.

UDC Office of Sponsored Programs
http://www.udc.edu/osrp/

Jovita Wells, Director, OSRP

Melissa Seldin, Research Officer
mseldin@udc.edu
202.274.7079

 

Funding opportunities

Local

UDC Seed Grant Program
-Provides $4000 with 25% release time
Contact: Dr. Beverly Hartline

UDC Agricultural Experiment Station
-Amount varies
Contact: Dr. Gloria Wyche-Moore

UDC Water Resources Research Institute
-Provides $15,000 for one year
Contact: Mr. William Hare

Others as advertised

 
 
 

EXAMPLES OF NIH FUNDED PROJECTS

Besides obvious basic projects, NIH funds variety of other areas.

  1. WELL-BEING OF SOUTH AFRICAN CHILDREN: HOUSEHOLD, COMMUNITY AND
    POLICY INFLUENCES
     
  2. IMPLEMENTING MOTIVATIONAL COUNSELING FOR PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2
    DIABETES
     
  3. END OF LIFE DECISION MAKING, COMMUNICATION AND MEANING
     
  4. THE ECONOMIC DETERMINANTS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
     
  5. WEB-BASED WELLNESS POLICY TOOLKIT FOR OBESITY PREVENTION IN MIDDLE
    SCHOOLS
     
  6. DEVELOPMENT OF BILINGUAL STORYBOOKS FOR FOOD FRIENDS, A PRESCHOOL
    NUTRITION EDUCATION
     
  7. MOTIVATIONAL INTERVIEWING TRAINING FOR DRUG ABUSE TREATMENT
    COUNSELORS

Other Ideas are always welcome at NIH ???

 

National Science Foundation
Remember: NSF funds Social Sciences

Other agencies

DoD
Home land security grants

Department of Education


Best place to go
http://www.grants.gov


More details are covered in OSRP grants workshop to be held every year

 

Private Foundations

  • Nongovernment, nonprofit organizations
     
  • Operate from a principle fund or endowment
     
  • governed by their own trustees and board of directors.
     
  • http://www.foundationcenter.org
    • Offers training workshops
    • Searchable database onsite
 

Examples

  • Sloan Foundation
     
  • Spencer Foundation
     
  • Annenberg Foundation
     
  • Rockefeller Brothers
     
  • Carnegie
     
  • Gates Foundation
 

Company Sponsored Foundations

  • Best Buy Foundation
     
  • Sprint Foundation
     
  • Verizon Foundation
     
  • Walmart Foundation
     
  • Bank of America
     
  • Fannie Mae
     
  • CVS
 

Undergraduate Research
Involve students in research and scholarly activities

Mutual benefits to students and faculty
Part of student Undergraduate Research
Collaborations between departments
Visibility of faculty member
Various programs exist at UDC that fund students

  • UDC SEP program
  • UDC LSAMP
  • UDC AES and WRRI
  • UDC Seed grant supports student
  • UDC STEM CENTER
  • UDC Cancer Research and Education Academy
  • Others…
 

Make yourself Visible
[through your research and your students]

UDC
Undergraduate Research Day
Research Seminars and Program Meetings
Other Network events at UDC

External
Conferences
Workshops
Seminars
Meeting with Program people at funding agencies
Collaborations with other agencies/Universities

 

COLLABORATE

  1. Within UDC and outside
     
  2. Look for faculty summer sabbaticals: a good way to start a collaboration
     
  3. Minority institution/faculty supplements to existing grants
     
  4. Academic-Private partnerships for faculty and student learning: Tax write-off for Industry
     
  5. Federal funds are available for academic-private partnerships.
     
  6. Think outside the box
     
  7. Visit other labs and see what they are doing
     
  8. Network with people in your area: Linkedin; Follow labs/people/writers on twitter;
    facebook; Technocrati: informal way to approach them and introduce for a possible
    collaboration.
 

Developing a Sustainable Research Program

  1. Fit your research to the local situation
     
  2. Schedule time for research
     
  3. Keep student research within your expertise
     
  4. Find a good mentor
     
  5. Understand your students
     
  6. Limit the # of your research students
     
  7. Ask for what you need
     
  8. Collaborate
     
  9. Pace yourself

Benjamin Pierce, CUR Q. 29: 23-28

 

S E R V I C E

Use of professional skills and or professional contacts or affiliations to strengthen academic programs , and institutional effectiveness and to outreach to the community.

 

TYPES OF SERVICE

  1. Service to the academic institution
    1. Service on committees at the department, college, and university levels
    2. Student advising and mentoring
    3. Guiding students research at the graduate and undergraduate levels
    4. Coordinating Service Learning activities
    5. Serving as institutional representatives
    6. Participation in accreditation activities
       
  2. Service to the Profession
    1. Assuming positions in professional organizations
    2. Serving on review panels
    3. Serving on editorial boards
    4. Judging competitive student papers or presentations
    5. Chairing sessions at professional conferences
       
  3. Community Service and Outreach
    (More integrated into teaching, research/scholarship at land-grant institutions)

    Using specific professional skills and competencies to assist the community in which the institution resides to resolve problems or improve quality of life.

    Examples –
    - Theater faculty assist with development of a youth drama group.
    - Science faculty serve as advisors or judges for high school science fair.
    - Ethics professor provides in-service for nursing volunteer in free clinic.

 

The Connection Between Tenure and Academic Freedom

http://chronicle.com/blogPost/The-Connection-Between-Tenure/7688/

 

Real Tenure Is Portable

http://chronicle.com/article/Real-Tenure-is-Portable/44851

 

Life With Tenure: Not What You Think

http://chronicle.com/article/Life-With-Tenure-Not-What-You/63454

 

Women See Less Clarity in Tenure Requirements Than Do Men

http://chronicle.com/article/Women-See-Less-Clarity-in/22555

 

Mentorings of Faculty: Principles and Practices At Duke University

March 7, 2006

http://www.provost.duke.edu/policies/Faculty_Mentoring_Initiative.htm

 

Emory University: Passages Program

 

 

VPAA Senior Administrators

Acting Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs
Dr. Rachel Petty
rpetty@udc.edu
202.274.5707

Assistant Provost for Academic Administration
Herman Prescott
hprescott@udc.edu
202.274.5311

Acting Associate Provost for Academic Programs
Dr. Connie M. Webster
cwebster@udc.edu
202.274.5899

Assistant Provost for Enrollment Management
Dwight Sanchez
dwight.sanchez@udc.edu
202.274.6158

Director of the Office of International Programs and Exchanges
Dr. Denis Antoine
dantoine@udc.edu
202.274.5933

Special Assistant to the Provost and Director of Title III
Dr. Ernesta Pendleton Williams
ependleton@udc.edu
202.274.5718

Director of the Office of Sponsored Programs
Jovita Wells, JD
jowells@udc.edu
202.274.6260

Special Assistant to the Provost
Denise Slaughter
dslaughter@udc.edu
202.274.5917

Staff Assistant to the Office of the Provost
Benyi Inyama
binyama@udc.edu
202.274.5072

Policies, Documents, Forms

Academic Policies & Procedures
6th Master Agreement
Faculty Handbook
(under revision)
Academic Strategic Plan
(in progress)